Minn. Attorney General Keith Ellison Says He Doesn’t Want Police Officers Responding To Rape Calls

(Evita Duffy) Keith Ellison, former Democrat National Committee vice chairman and current Minnesota attorney general, said he does not want police officers to respond to rape calls. The shocking policy suggestion occurred during a Zoom conversation featuring Ellison and Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) to discuss racism and police reforms. The dialogue was moderated by White House correspondent for “PBS NewsHour” Yamiche Alcindor.

Keith Ellison, former Democrat National Committee vice chairman and current Minnesota attorney general

Ellison stated: “If you’re a woman who’s been a victim of a sexual assault, and the assailant ran away, wouldn’t you rather talk to somebody who is trained in helping you deal with what you’re dealing with, as opposed to somebody whose main training is that they know how to use a firearm? Right?”

https://youtu.be/13smjgjTglM

In a tweet one user was appalled by the attorney general’s disregard for police officer capabilities, writing, “How is this guy an AG? Doesn’t he know they have special units trained to deal with sexual assault victims. What an insult – ‘their main training is how to use a weapon.’ Yes, help the victim, but catch the perp! Good grief.”

GOP rapid response director Steve Guest tweeted his prediction should Ellison and the radical left win in November, “This is Joe Biden’s Democrat Party and a reminder that you won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America.”

A rape survivor responded to Guest’s tweet explaining, “Having been raped, I didn’t feel safe until I knew that the perpetrators were caught and was grateful for the police. Also, it was the police who directed me to community resources to help with the trauma and therapeutic resolutions. The ignorance of this man is insulting.”

Ellison’s desire to no longer allow police to respond to rape calls is shared by many on the left and its “defund the police” movement. A recent article by Moria Donegan in The Guardian is titled, “Who will protect you from rape without police?’ Here’s my answer to that question.” Donegan’s conclusion in the piece is, “As feminists, we must recognize that the police are more likely to hurt women than to help us.”

Ellison’s disregard for victims of violence is especially troubling given his personal history. In 2006 and 2018, Ellison was accused of physical and verbal abuse by former girlfriends. Amy Louise Alexander, who says she had an affair with Ellison while he was married to Kim Ellison, alleges the former congressman grabbed and pushed her during an argument. Ellison denies having a sexual relationship with Alexander.  

In 2018, while he was campaigning to be Minnesota’s attorney general, the top legal officer of the state, more disturbing accusations of abuse surfaced. This time, former girlfriend Karen Monahan released a statement to local affiliate Fox 9. In the bombshell statement, Monahan painted a picture of a long-term relationship with Ellison that was so emotionally and physically abusive it led to Monahan acquiring a case of “complex PTSD.”

Monahan’s statement included disturbing descriptions of the abuse she says she endured. It is worth noting that this abuse allegedly occurred while Ellison was a U.S. congressman: 

One night I confronted him very calm about a lie he had just told me straight to my face (sic). What happened next was a rage that I had never witnessed to that magnitude. He was becoming a person I had never seen before. The next morning, he came into the room I was sleeping in. I was laying across the bed with my headphones on, listening to podcast on my phone. He said he was about to leave town for the weekend and told me to take the trash out (sic). Given the explosive outrage that occurred the night before, I just should shook my head yes. I didn’t look up at him or saying anything (sic). That is when he tried to drag me off the bed by my legs and feet, screaming ‘b-tch you answer when I am talking to you. I said take out the trash, you’re a bad guest’ (even though we were living in the same place) (sic). He kept trying to drag me off the bed, telling me to get the f-ck out of his house, over and over. I froze. He had to leave and get on the plane. He knocked the shoe off my foot and told me I better be gone when he gets back (which was in two days).

Because of the explosive nature and timing of the accusations, Minnesota’s Democrat Party was forced to launch an investigation into the allegation. They appointed a local attorney who had links to the state party. Unsurprisingly, the attorney hired by the Democrat Party found Monahan’s abuse claim unsubstantiated. Ellison went on to become Minnesota’s first black and first Muslim AG. 

Ironically, Monahan’s allegations coincided with the infamous Brett Kavanaugh investigations. Even though Justice Kavanaugh’s accuser presented zero evidence and he was ultimately exonerated, his reputation has suffered greatly from the accusation in a high-profile, high-stakes Supreme Court confirmation hearing.

Donald Trump Jr. pointed out the hypocrisy of the media’s portrayal of Kavanaugh and Ellison, whose accuser even presented medical records bolstering her claim: “Interesting how quiet the left/media (redundant I know) is on this given that there seems to be ACTUAL EVIDENCE that something happened here. Why the double standard? U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison’s ex-girlfriend posts medical record alleging abuse.”

This all questions whether Ellison can be considered a credible and unbiased voice on the issue of violence against women. Since Democrats vehemently maintain that accusers should be believed regardless of evidence, by their standards Ellison has an insurmountable conflict of interest.

Source: By Evita Duffy | The Federalist

2 thoughts on “Minn. Attorney General Keith Ellison Says He Doesn’t Want Police Officers Responding To Rape Calls

  1. Dave Rubin

    BLACK CRIMES MATTER
    Despite being only 13.5% of the population and Black males between 16-26 make up 4% of the Black community, 4% Black males commit:
    52% of all Murder and Manslaughter
    52% of all Murder and Manslaughter
    52% of all Murder and Manslaughter
    52% of all Murder and Manslaughter
    31% of all Rapes
    31% of all Rapes
    31% of all Rapes
    31% of all Rapes

    56% of all Robbery
    34% of all Aggravated assault
    30% of all Burglary
    29% of all Larceny-theft
    30% of all Motor vehicle theft
    23% of all Arson
    39% of all Violent crime
    29% of all Property crime
    32% of all “Other assaults”
    34% of all Forgery and Counterfeiting
    32% of all Fraud
    35% of all Embezzlement
    30% of all Stolen property buying, receiving, possessing
    26% of all Vandalism
    40% of all Weapon carrying and possessing
    41% of all Prostitution and commercialized vice
    25% of all Sex offenses (rape and prostitution excluded, see above)
    30% of all Drug abuse
    67% of all Gambling
    33% of all Offenses against family and children
    13% of all Driving under the influence
    15% of all Liquor laws
    16% of all Drunkenness
    35% of all Disorderly conduct
    32% of all Vagrancy
    30% of all “All other offenses except traffic”
    37% of all Suspicion
    45% of all Curfew and loitering law violations

    https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/c jis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2013/ crime-in-the-u.s.-2013/tables/ table-43

    Like

    Reply
  2. Dave Rubin

    WHY DON’T BLACKS PROTEST WHEN BLACKS SLAUGHTER OTHER BLACKS?
    THE BLACK HOLOCAUST
    JOHN W. FOUNTAIN
    author@johnwfountain.com
    Last Modified: May 6, 2012
    Imagine Soldier Field beyond capacity, brimming with 63,879 young African-American men, ages 18 to 24 — more than U.S. losses in the entire Vietnam conflict. Imagine the University of Michigan’s football stadium — the largest in the U.S. — filled to its limit of 109,901 with black men, age 25 and older. Now add 28,223 more — together totaling more than U.S. deaths in World War I.

    Picture two UIC Pavilions packed with 12,658 Trayvon Martins — black boys, ages 14 to 17 — nearly twice the number of U.S. lives lost in Iraq and Afghanistan. Now picture all of them dead. The national tally of black males 14 and older murdered in America from 1976 through 2005, according to U.S. Bureau of Justice statistics: 214,661. The numbers tell only part of the story of this largely urban war, where the victims bear an uncanny resemblance to their killers. A war of brother against brother, filled with wanton and automatic gunfire, even in the light of day, on neighborhood streets, where little boys make mud pies, schoolgirls jump rope, where the innocent are caught in the crossfire, where the spirit of murder blows like the wind. It is, so far, a ceaseless war in which guns are often the weapon of choice, and the finger on the trigger of the gun pointed at a black male is most often another black male’s.

    The numbers alone are enough to make me cry — to wonder why — we as African Americans will march en masse over one slain by someone who is not black, and yet sit silent over the hundreds of thousands of us obliterated from this mortal world by someone black like us, like me. It is a numbing truth borne out by hard facts: From 1980 through 2008, 93% of black victims were killed by blacks. Translation: For every Trayvon Martin killed by someone not black, nine other blacks were murdered by someone black.

    In 2005, — blacks — accounted for 13% of the U.S. population but 49% of all homicides. The numbers are staggering, the loss incomprehensible. Add to the tally of black males 14 and older slain across the country from 1976 to 2005, another 29,335 (slain from 2006 to 2010), and their national body count rises to 243,996, representing 82% of all black homicides for that 35-year period. What also becomes clear is this: We too often have raised killers. And this war is claiming our sons. But that’s still not the end of the story. Add to that number 51,892 black females ages 14 and older, plus five whose gender was not identifiable, and the total, not counting children, is 295,893 — more than the combined U.S. losses of World War I, the Vietnam, Korean and Mexican-American wars, the War of 1812 and the American Revolutionary War.

    Is the blood of these sons and daughters somehow less American? Two hundred ninety-five thousand eight hundred ninety-three . . . Imagine the United Center, Wrigley Field, U.S. Cellular Field and Soldier Field nearly all filled simultaneously with black boys, girls, men and women. Now imagine that twice over. Now imagine them all dead. As far as I can see, that’s at least 295,893 reasons to cry. And it is cause enough for reticent churches, for communities, for lackadaisical leaders, for all people — no matter our race, color or creed — to find the collective will and the moral resolve to stamp out this human rights atrocity occurring right under our noses. Just imagine the human carnage and the toll to us all if we don’t.
    I can’t. I won’t.
    JOHN W. FOUNTAIN

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.