Category Archives: American History

Are We Really Free?

Are We Really Free? Maybe It’s Time for a Personal Declaration of Independence

 

Some time between throwing some burgers on the grill and shooting off fireworks with a beer in one hand and a lighter in the other, ask yourself this question:

How free and independent are you?

How independent are any of us, really? We like to think we live in the “free-est” nation in the world, but do we really?  Think about it.

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They’re Crawling With Demons

 

It’s high time they wake up and realize that banking on the long odds of the devil’s plan will never come through for them.

Whom ye will serve?

Atomic Veterans Were Silenced for 50 Years And Now, They’re Talking

Nearly everyone who’s seen it and lived to tell the tale describes it the same way: a horrifying, otherworldly thing of ghastly beauty that has haunted their life ever since.

(The Atlantic) “The colors were beautiful,” remembers a man in Morgan Knibbe’s short documentary The Atomic Soldiers. “I hate to say that.”

“It was completely daylight at midnight—brighter than the brightest day you ever saw,” says another.

Many tales of the atomic bomb, however, weren’t told at all. In addition to the hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians who died in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, an estimated 400,000 American soldiers and sailors also observed nuclear explosions—many just a mile or two from ground zero. From 1946 to 1992, the U.S. government conducted more than 1,000 nuclear tests, during which unwitting troops were exposed to vast amounts of ionizing radiation. For protection, they wore utility jackets, helmets, and gas masks. They were told to cover their face with their arms.

After the tests, the soldiers, many of whom were traumatized, were sworn to an oath of secrecy. Breaking it even to talk among themselves was considered treason, punishable by a $10,000 fine and 10 or more years in prison.

In Knibbe’s film, some of these atomic veterans break the forced silence to tell their story for the very first time. They describe how the blast knocked them to the ground; how they could see the bones and blood vessels in their hands, like viewing an X-ray. They recount the terror in their officers’ faces and the tears and panic that followed the blasts. They talk about how they’ve been haunted—by nightmares, PTSD, and various health afflictions, including cancer. Knibbe’s spare filmmaking approach foregrounds details and emotion. There’s no need for archival footage; the story is writ large in the faces of the veterans, who struggle to find the right words to express the horror of what they saw during the tests and what they struggled with in the decades after.

Knibbe told me that he has long been fascinated with the self-destructive tendencies of mankind. When he found declassified U.S. civil-defense footage of soldiers maneuvering in the glare of the mushroom cloud of an atomic bomb, he was “absolutely amazed and wanted to learn more about their stories.” His efforts to dig deeper were curtailed by the fact that most of the information about the nuclear tests was classified—including reports on the illnesses the veterans suffered and the radioactive pollution that was released into the environment around the test sites. “I was baffled by the lack of recorded testimonies available,” he said.

Knibbe began trying to contact veterans through the National Association of Atomic Veterans, eventually traveling across the United States to meet them and hear their stories. He was stunned and saddened by what he learned. “They were confronted by such an incredible destructive power that they were immediately shocked into an existential crisis,” Knibbe said. “It was like they saw the creation of the universe. They were confronted with an enemy they could never defeat. It was something really difficult for them to describe.”

What appalled Knibbe the most was how the U.S. government failed the veterans. “Until this day, a lot of what has happened—and the radiation-related diseases the veterans have contracted and passed on to the generations after them—is still being covered up,” Knibbe said. “The veterans are consistently denied compensation.”

“For 10 years now, I’ve been trying to get compensation, but the government does not want to admit that anybody was harmed by any radiation,” says one man in the film. Knibbe said he has spoken with more than 100 U.S. atomic veterans, all of whom share similar stories of the government’s intransigence. One of the few studies conducted on atomic veterans found that the 3,000 participants in a 1957 nuclear test suffered from leukemia at more than twice the rate of their peers.

Bill Clinton relieved the veterans’ oath of secrecy in 1994, but the announcement was eclipsed by news from the O. J. Simpson trial. “Most of the atomic veterans didn’t even know the oath of secrecy was lifted,” Knibbe said. Most went on to believe that they were not allowed to talk about their experiences, even to seek help for their health problems. Many took the secret to their grave.

“It haunts me to think of what I had witnessed,” says a man in the film, “and not realized at the time the import of what we were doing … serving as guinea pigs.”

Source: by Morgan Kinibbe | The Atlantic

Chick-fil-A Honors Fallen Servicemen With ‘Missing Man Table’

Table: a table set for one is small symbolizing the frailty of one isolated prisoner. The table is round to represent everlasting concern on the part of the survivors for their missing loved ones.

The tablecloth: the tablecloth is white symbolizing purity of their intentions to respond to their country’s call to arms.

A single rose: a single rose in a vase signifies the blood that many have shed in sacrifice to ensure the freedom of our beloved United States of America. This rose also reminds us of our beloved family and friends or our missing comrades who keep the faith, while awaiting their return.

Yellow ribbon: the yellow ribbon around the vase represents the yellow ribbon worn on the lapels of the thousands who demand with unyielding determination a proper accounting of our comrades who are not among us tonight.

A slice of lemon: the slice of lemon on a bread plate represents the bitter fate of the missing. 

Salt: the salt sprinkled on the bread plate symbolizes of the countless fallen tears of families as they wait.

Inverted glass: this glass inverted on the table represents the fact that the missing and fallen cannot partake of the food and drink set at the table.

The Bible: the Bible represents the spiritual strength and faith to sustain those lost from our country.

A lit candle: the lit candle is reminiscent of the light of hope which lives in our hearts to illuminate their way home, away from their captors, to open the arms of a grateful nation. 

Empty chair: the empty chair represents the missing and fallen aren’t present.

How Dennis Montgomery, ‘The Hamr’ Surveillance System Whistleblower Became Deep State Enemy Number One After Exposing The Truth

Update: Information presented in the following video by retired CIA officer Kevin Shipp claims Dennis Montgomery, CIA/DOD/DHS/NSA/FBI Contractor Turned Whistleblower did not design the ‘Hamr’ surveillance system; that the whole story was a hoax perpetrated by Dennis Montgomery.

Is this the truth or not?

Watch and decide for yourself…  

 

Original story below…


Remember, do not kill a mockingbird. When a whistleblower is singing for America’s protection, we embrace and celebrate him.

Dennis Montgomery, CIA/DOD/DHS/NSA/FBI Contractor Turned Whistleblower

(Mary Fanning and Alan Jones May 22, 2019) Inventor and software designer Dennis Montgomery, a CIA/DOD/DHS/NSA/FBI  contractor-turned-whistleblower, alerted FBI Director James Comey’s office in 2015 that President Obama’s CIA Director John Brennan and Obama’s Director of National Intelligence James Clapper had turned the super-surveillance system that Montgomery designed for foreign surveillance, known as THE HAMR, into a domestic surveillance system.

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President Trump Declares National Emergency For Information and Communication Technology…

Here we go….  President Trump is laying the groundwork to ban telecommunication companies based on identified risk to national security (ie. Huawei). Nations who engage in 5-G technology agreements are on notice they may be cut-off from communication partnerships with the U.S.A.

[I think Wall Street just pee’d their pants a little..]

https://theconservativetreehouse.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/trump-oval-office-4.jpg

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Hernan Cortes, Father Of Mexico, Landed Exactly 500 Years Ago

(by Allan Wall) April 22 was the 500th anniversary of Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes’ landing at Veracruz, Mexico, in 1519. Cortes’ small army and a growing corps of Indian allies, the coastal Totonacs and the Tlaxcaltecans of central Mexico, marched to the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, now Mexico City and conquered the Aztecs in a two-year titanic struggle. From their empire’s ashes was born modern Mexico. But modern Mexicans are ambivalent about Cortes, and neither Mexico nor Spain is commemorating the anniversary.

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