Category Archives: Food

Survival Garden Calorie Count

If you have a survival garden, kudos! But I have a question: Are you growing high-calorie foods? It occurred to me that a simple backyard garden isn’t going to sustain your family very long if you’re growing typical vegetables like cucumbers, radishes and tomatoes.

Although healthy and nutritious, those foods are very low calorie and really only work as part of a larger meal. If you want to get a substantial amount of calories from your garden during a long-term disaster, take a look at this food calorie chart.

Using Microsoft Excel I made a chart with a list of all the most common nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables that a person might be able to grow. Then I visited NutritionData.Self.com and looked up the data for the raw, uncooked version of each food. I entered the calories, fat, protein, carbohydrates, and fiber per 100 grams into the chart. Finally, I sorted the chart by calories so I could easily see which foods have the most calories.

Of course, some foods are easier to grow than others, and some plants yield more edible food than others. Still, I think this food calorie chart will help people prioritize when deciding which foods they want to grow. I’ve found it interesting to sort by fat, protein and carbs as well. Nuts have the most fat, beans have the most protein and carbs, but fruits and vegetables have the most vitamins. You should take all these things into account when planning your survival garden.

If you want your own copy of the chart that you can add to and sort, click here. I also encourage you to share the picture below with other survivalists, particularly those interested in gardening. It will be shame when people with gardens full of lettuce, squash and spinach are going hungry.

Source: by Alan | Urban Survival Site

“Your Food Supply Is In Danger”, Texas Rancher Warns America

A Texas rancher warns that the US beef supply will plummet if ranches start culling cattle ready to butcher due to shut-down processing plants not taking livestock.

Right now there’s plenty of cattle to meet beef demand, but because fewer processing plants are operating at full capacity, the bottleneck could reduce cattle supply and thus exacerbate the beef shortage.

The USDA has already said it would “advise and assist on depopulation and disposal methods” of livestock if they cannot be moved to market due to the closures since current regulations don’t give ranchers much maneuverability.

“They are preparing us to depopulate the fat cattle ready to harvest because of a bottleneck created by the effects of Covid,” a rancher from Archer Co., Texas, warns. “…We are in trouble. Our food supply is in trouble.”

The rancher also pointed out that while the USA – which could feed the entire world if properly managed – is about to start culling cattle, the nation is still importing less-regulated beef from Namibia in Southern Africa.

“And yet they’re telling us to prepare to euthanize harvest-ready cattle,” he added. “Am I the only one who sees a problem in this? It is time to get the American people back to work. It is time we get money flowing. It is time we get food on the shelves.”

Source: by Kit Daniels | Infowars

Tyson Foods Warns “Food Supply Chain Is Breaking”

News feeds in April have been inundated with food supply chain disruption stories due to coronavirus-related shutdowns. At least a third of US meatpacking facilities handling hogs have shifted offline this month, other plants that process cows and chickens have also shuttered operations, forcing farmers to cull herds and flocks. This is because each plant closure diminishes the ability for a farmer to sell animals at the market, leaves them with overcapacity issues similar to the turmoil facing the oil industry. Only unlike oil where pumped oil must be stored somewhere (as one can’t just dump it in the nearest river) even if that ends up costing producers money as we saw last Monday when oil prices turned negative for the first time ever, food producers have a simpler option: just killing their livestock.

We previously explained what this imbalance has created: crashing live cattle spot prices while finished meat prices are soaring, which doesn’t just affect farmers but also consumers simultaneously and could spark a shortage of meat at grocery stores as soon as the first week of May.

And in the starkest warning yet that high food prices could last for a long time, Tyson Foods warned in a full-page ad  in the New York Times on Sunday that the “food supply chain is breaking.”

“As pork, beef and chicken plants are being forced to close, even for short periods of time, millions of pounds of meat will disappear from the supply chain,” wrote Tyson Chairman John Tyson, patriarch of the company’s founding family, in a Tyson Foods website post that also ran as a full-page ad in several newspapers. “The food supply chain is breaking.”

Confirming the worst fears of American pork and bacon consumers, Tyson wrote that the company has been forced to close plants, and that federal, state and local government officials needed to coordinate to allow plants to operate safely, “without fear, panic or worry” among employees. He warned that supply shortages of its products will be seen at grocery stores, as at least a dozen major meatpacking plants close operations for virus-related issues. 

Brett Stuart, president of Denver-based consulting firm Global AgriTrends, calls the situation “absolutely unprecedented.” 

“It’s a lose-lose situation where we have producers at the risk of losing everything and consumers at the risk of paying higher prices.” 

Last week, Smithfield Foods, one of the top pork producers in the world, closed another operation in Illinois. That news came directly after Hormel Foods closed two of its Jennie-O turkey plants in Minnesota. Then it was reported over the weekend that major poultry plants across Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia had reduced hours because of worker shortages due to virus issues. And then on Sunday, JBS USA closed a large beef production facility in Wisconsin. 

Bloomberg’s map shows the latest closures of meatpacking plants: 

Even before the Tyson warnings, last week we cautioned that it was appropriate to label virus outbreaks at meatpacking plants as the “next disaster zones” of the pandemic. This wasn’t just because of workers and USDA inspectors were contracting the virus, and in some cases dying – but because food shortages could also add to social instabilities during a pandemic and economic crisis. 

The distress in the agricultural space has not been limited to just livestock. Dairy and produce farmers have had to dump or throw out spoiled products due to a collapse in demand for bulk products, mostly because of shifting supply chains with the closure of restaurants, cruise ships, hotels, resorts, education systems, and anyone else who is not deemed essential in a lock down.

What this means is that farmers who generally sell bulk products do not have the means at the moment to convert product lines into individual items for direct to consumer selling. This will take time for the conversion. So, in the meantime, with no customers, farmers have to dump. 

Politico has outlined some of this disruption: 

“Images of farmers destroying tomatoes, piling up squash, burying onions and dumping milk shocked many Americans who remain fearful of supply shortages. At the same time, people who recently lost their jobs lined up for miles outside some food banks, raising questions about why there has been no coordinated response at the federal level to get the surplus of perishable food to more people in need, even as commodity groups, state leaders and lawmakers repeatedly urged the Agriculture Department to step in.”

Tom Vilsack, who served as agriculture secretary during the Obama administration, put it this way: “It’s not a lack of food, it’s that the food is in one place and the demand is somewhere else and they haven’t been able to connect the dots. You’ve got to galvanize people.”

The immediate outcome of this food supply chain collapse will be even more rapid food inflation, hitting Americans at a time of unprecedented economic hardships with at least 26.5 million now unemployed since the pandemic struck the US.

And with a sharp economic recession, if not outright depression unfolding, more Americans are ditching grocery stores for food banks, putting incredible stress on these charities, which has forced the government to deploy National Guard troops at many locations to ensure food security to the neediest.

Source: ZeroHedge

Why Does New Microsoft Ad Feature Famous ‘Spirit Cooking’ Witch Marina Abramovic?

Tech giant taps elite-connected black magic performer to unveil next-generation virtual reality hardware

Update: Microsoft’s advertisement has been removed from YouTube after receiving swift online backlash. Infowars has reached out for comment and will post a reply if given. The video amassed approximately 25,000 thumbs down votes and only 626 thumbs up votes by the time it was removed.

Original article appears below with an archived copy of the ad:


A new Microsoft commercial promoting its premiere virtual reality headgear featured the queen of occult symbolism and Spirit Cooking priestess known as Marina Abramovic.

In the visually unsettling ad showcasing the Hololens 2 “mixed reality” device, Abramovich explains why the new tech appeals to her dark tastes.

https://www.brighteon.com/0643fc43-0084-4f4a-905a-d7d42ac5dcba

“I believe that art of the future is art without objects. It’s just pure transmission of energy between the viewer and the artist,” Abramovic says.

“To me, mixed reality is this answer.”

Microsoft goes on to praise the “legendary artist’s” new “mixed reality” artwork using the Hololens 2 called “The Life.”

The performance art features the black magic practitioner suddenly appearing like an apparition in the virtual realm donned in a red robe.

“I really want you to be here with me in the space and here now,” Abramovic says. “The life is dealing with what is going to stay after I’m not there anymore, and I can face myself, and this frightening experience.”

“Really like you’re facing your own ghost, but it is always this greater idea of immortality. Once you die the work could never die because the work of art can continue.”

“In performance, the peace is only in the memory of the audience and nowhere else,” she concludes. “Here I am kept forever.”

Abramovic, 73, is a well-known figure among certain political and entertainment circles.

Former Clinton manager John Podesta’s emails released by WikiLeaks in 2016 revealed Abramovic held Satanic ceremonies known as “Spirit Cooking” with the Clinton operatives and other elites.

The video above depicts the bizarre nature of the ceremony. Abramovic mixes together thickly congealed blood as the “recipe” for the “painting,” which is comprised of the words, “With a sharp knife cut deeply into the middle finger of your left hand eat the pain.”

The ceremony is, “meant to symbolize the union between the microcosm, Man, and the macrocosm, the Divine, which is a representation of one of the prime maxims in Hermeticism “As Above, So Below.”

Would a tech company really want a Luciferian individual like her to be the face of their new “mixed reality” device because of her “art”?

The new documentary Out of Shadows details more about Abramovic and her Hollywood/political ties, as well as the CIA’s role in the entertainment and news industry:

Source: Jamie White | Infowars

How To Build And Service An Inexpensive Hydroponics/Aeroponics System

Hydroponics expert, Scott Dekarske, and Master Gardener, Stephan Leonard, show how to assemble an inexpensive aeroponics system. It only takes an hour or two to assemble.

2 1/2 Months Later

We have the system in an unused office and it is doing great. The tomatoes have tons of small fruit on them. We have had to start pinching back the tomato plants to keep them from growing bigger than the trellis we built. The cucumber and watermelon died. We have put some rooted cuttings from a bell pepper plant that did amazing this year in the outside soil garden. We hope to be able to take cuttings from these plants in the spring and put it back outside again. 

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5 Months Later

We have been harvesting tomatoes for the last month and a half. So far we have picked about 50 tomatoes and have tons more blooms and green fruit growing. They taste good.

We have noticed a couple of things about growing indoors. Tomatoes are wind pollinated, the pollen has to fall within the flower. In the still air of the office it won’t do that and the flower will die without setting fruit. In the wild the wind moves the plant around and bumps the pollen and makes it move within the flower. We have found that banging on the wooden frame or tapping the branches with flowers every day gets the fruit to set very reliably. Most of the branches have every flower set a tomato.

Another thing we have noticed is that we have blight. Chris Cooper said it is a type of fungus you don’t see very often in the fields because it only grows in very still air. We have put a fan on the shelf above the plants to try to get more air movement and stop the blight. We have also cut some of the more blighted leaves out.


We are having to add about a gallon a day to the tote to top it off. The plants drink a ton of water. There are days when we have seen drops of water sitting on the leaves of the tomatoes. This is another reason we have added the fan.


We have also turned the tote to take better advantage of the light from the window.

In the next few days we will be pruning the tomatoes to remove all the branches that will not produce any more fruit. The plants are determinant and we had to pinch the tops of them when they got close to the ceiling. Many of those branches have produced and are done. Tomatoes only produce on new growth. Cutting them out will allow the suckers to grow and take their place. 

We have some small pepper plants that are from cuttings we took from the outside garden. The have survived but I think they don’t get enough light so we got a smaller grow light for them. They seem to be doing better now. 

The best part of the hydroponics so far is the snow-matoes. It might be 10 degrees and snowy outside but there are ripe tomatoes waiting.

How To Change Your Hydroponics/Aeroponics Nutrient Solution

List of Parts for Hydroponic Garden

hydroponics_tote_parts_list.pdf

Download File

Source: Family Plot Garden

29 States Just Made It Illegal For Counties And Cities To Pass Seed Laws

With little notice, more than two dozen state legislatures have passed “seed-preemption laws” designed to block counties and cities from adopting their own rules on the use of seeds, including bans on GMOs, according to a list compiled by the American Seed Trade Association. Opponents say that there’s nothing more fundamental than a seed, and that now, in many parts of the country, decisions about what can be grown have been taken out of local control and put solely in the hands of the state. 

“This bill should be viewed for what it is — a gag order on public debate,” says Kristina Hubbard, director of advocacy and communications at the Organic Seed Alliance, a national advocacy group, and a resident of Montana, which along with Texas passed a seed-preemption bill this year. “This thinly disguised attack on local democracy can be easily traced to out-of-state, corporate interests that want to quash local autonomy.”

Seed-preemption laws are part of a spate of legislative initiatives by industrial agriculture, including ag-gag laws passed in several states that legally prohibit outsiders from photographing farms, and “right-to-farm” laws that make it easier to snuff out complaints about animal welfare. The seed laws, critics say, are a related thrust meant to protect the interests of agro-chemical companies.

Nearly every seed-preemption law in the country borrows language from a 2013 model bill drafted by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). The council is “a pay-to-play operation where corporations buy a seat and a vote on ‘task forces’ to advance their legislative wish lists,” essentially “voting as equals” with state legislators on bills, according to The Center for Media and Democracy. ALEC’s corporate members include the Koch brothers as well as some of the largest seed-chemical companies — Monsanto, Bayer, and DuPont — which want to make sure GMO bans, like those enacted in Jackson County, Oregon, and Boulder County, Colorado, don’t become a trend.

Seed-preemption laws have been adopted in 29 states, including Oregon — one of the world’s top five seed-producing regions — California, Iowa, and Colorado, according to the American Seed Trade Association. In some cases, the preemption is explicit, and in others implied and subject to interpretation. In Oregon, the bill was green lighted in 2014 after Monsanto and Syngenta spent nearly $500,000 fighting a GMO ban in Jackson County. Monsanto, Dow AgroSciences, and Syngenta also spent more than $6.9 million opposing anti-GMO rules in three Hawaiian counties, and thousands more in campaign donations. (These companies are also involved in mergers that, if approved, would create three seed-agrochemical giants.)

Montana and Texas were the latest states to join the seed-preemption club. Farming is the largest industry in Montana, and Texas is the third-largest agricultural state in terms of production, behind California and Iowa.

Language in the Texas version of the bill preempts not only local laws that affect seeds but also local laws that deal with “cultivating plants grown from seed.” In theory, that could extend to almost anything: what kinds of manure or fertilizer can be used, or whether a county can limit irrigation during a drought, says Judith McGeary, executive director of the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance. Along with other activists, her organization was able to force an amendment to the Texas bill guaranteeing the right to impose local water restrictions. Still, the law’s wording remains uncomfortably open to interpretation, she says.   

In both Montana and Texas, the laws passed with support from the state chapter of the Farm Bureau Federation — the nation’s largest farm-lobbying group — and other major ag groups, including the Montana Stock Growers Association and the Texas Seed Trade Alliance. In Texas, DuPont and Dow Chemical also joined the fight, publicly registering their support for the bill. 

Echoing President Trump’s anti-regulatory rhetoric, preemption proponents argue that, fundamentally, seed-preemption laws are about cutting the red tape from around farmers’ throats. Supporters also contend that counties and cities don’t have the expertise or the resources to make sound scientific decisions about the safety or quality of seeds.

“We don’t believe the locals have the science that the state of Texas has,” said Jim Reaves, legislative director of the Texas Farm Bureau. “So we think it’s better held in the state’s hands. It will basically tell cities that if you have a problem with a certain seed, the state can ban it, but you can’t.”

Other preemption proponents claim that local seed rules would simply get too complicated, forcing growers to navigate conflicting laws in different counties. “Many of us farm fields in more than one county,” said Don Steinbeisser Jr., a Sidney, Montana, farmer who testified in support of his state’s bill at a legislative hearing this spring.“Having different rules in each county would make management a nightmare and add costs to the crops that we simply do not need and cannot afford.”

But critics of preemption laws, including farmers (organic and conventional) and some independent seed companies, are afraid of losing their legislative rights. They claim something far more serious than a single farmer’s crop is at stake.   

“There is no looming threat that warrants forfeiting the independence of local agricultural communities in the form of sweeping language that eliminates all local authority governing one of our most valuable national resources,” says Hubbard of the Organic Seed Alliance. 

Organic farmers can lose their crop if it becomes contaminated with genetically modified material. Even conventional farmers who rely on exports to Asia, where GMOs are banned by some countries, face risks from contamination. There are currently no plans to push for a GMO ban anywhere in Texas or Montana, and neither state requires companies to disclose the use of GMOs. (In Montana, at least, Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, added an amendment to the preemption bill when he signed it, preserving the right of local governments to require that farmers notify their neighbors if they’re planting GMO seeds.) Yet critics of the preemption laws fear that they tie the hands of local governments, which will make it harder for communities to respond to problems in the future. 

Still, the fight isn’t just about GMOs, says Judith McGeary, noting that seeds coated with neonicotinoids — a class of pesticides linked to colony collapse disorder in bees — are also at issue. Under the Texas bill, a local government can’t ban neonic seeds in order to protect pollinator insects, and in the current political climate, it’s hard to imagine that such a ban would happen on the state level.

“We have an extremely large state with an incredible diversity of agricultural practices and ecological conditions, and you’ve now hobbled any ability to address a problem that’s found in one local area,” says McGeary. “Until it’s a big enough issue for a state of 23 million to pay attention to through the state legislature, nothing is going to happen,” she says.

Source: by Kristina Johnson | Fern’s AG Insider

Best Way To Clean And Cook Squirrel

With the whole economy shutting down, some of us might need to broaden the menu.

(Backwoods Gourmet Channel) Join us for an OLD SOUTHERN RECIPE for Squirrel Smother Fried with Gravy and Buscuits. I will bake the biscuits in the Dutch Oven and make the Squirrel Gravy in some cast iron. This is the BEST WAY TO COOK ‘CHICKEN OF THE TREE’ I have have ever tasted.