Category Archives: Wild West

Little Barbies: Sex Trafficking of Young Girls Is America’s Dirty Little Secret

Quentin Tarantino Describes How Hollywood Elite View Sex With Children

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Children are being targeted and sold for sex in America every day.”—John Ryan, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

They’re called the Little Barbies.

Children, young girls—some as young as 9 years old—are being bought and sold for sex in America. The average age for a young woman being sold for sex is now 13 years old.

This is America’s dirty little secret.

Sex trafficking—especially when it comes to the buying and selling of young girls—has become big business in America, the fastest growing business in organized crime and the second most-lucrative commodity traded illegally after drugs and guns.

As investigative journalist Amy Fine Collins notes, “It’s become more lucrative and much safer to sell malleable teens than drugs or guns. A pound of heroin or an AK-47 can be retailed once, but a young girl can be sold 10 to 15 times a day—and a ‘righteous’ pimp confiscates 100 percent of her earnings.”

Consider this: every two minutes, a child is exploited in the sex industry.

According to USA Today, adults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year in the United States.

Who buys a child for sex? Otherwise ordinary men from all walks of life.

They could be your co-worker, doctor, pastor or spouse,” writes journalist Tim Swarens, who spent more than a year investigating the sex trade in America.

In Georgia alone, it is estimated that 7,200 men (half of them in their 30s) seek to purchase sex with adolescent girls each month, averaging roughly 300 a day.

On average, a child might be raped by 6,000 men during a five-year period of servitude.

It is estimated that at least 100,000 children—girls and boys—are bought and sold for sex in the U.S. every year, with as many as 300,000 children in danger of being trafficked each year. Some of these children are forcefully abducted, others are runaways, and still others are sold into the system by relatives and acquaintances.

“Human trafficking—the commercial sexual exploitation of American children and women, via the Internet, strip clubs, escort services, or street prostitution—is on its way to becoming one of the worst crimes in the U.S.,” said prosecutor Krishna Patel.

This is an industry that revolves around cheap sex on the fly, with young girls and women who are sold to 50 men each day for $25 apiece, while their handlers make $150,000 to $200,000 per child each year.

This is not a problem found only in big cities.

It’s happening everywhere, right under our noses, in suburbs, cities and towns across the nation.

As Ernie Allen of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children points out, “The only way not to find this in any American city is simply not to look for it.”

Don’t fool yourselves into believing that this is merely a concern for lower income communities or immigrants.

It’s not.

It is estimated that there are 100,000 to 150,000 under-aged child sex workers in the U.S. These girls aren’t volunteering to be sex slaves. They’re being lured—forced—trafficked into it. In most cases, they have no choice.

In order to avoid detection (in some cases aided and abetted by the police) and cater to male buyers’ demand for sex with different women, pimps and the gangs and crime syndicates they work for have turned sex trafficking into a highly mobile enterprise, with trafficked girls, boys and women constantly being moved from city to city, state to state, and country to country.

For instance, the Baltimore-Washington area, referred to as The Circuit, with its I-95 corridor dotted with rest stops, bus stations and truck stops, is a hub for the sex trade.

No doubt about it: this is a highly profitable, highly organized and highly sophisticated sex trafficking business that operates in towns large and small, raking in upwards of $9.5 billion a year in the U.S. alone by abducting and selling young girls for sex.

Every year, the girls being bought and sold gets younger and younger.

The average age of those being trafficked is 13. Yet as the head of a group that combats trafficking pointed out, “Let’s think about what average means. That means there are children younger than 13. That means 8-, 9-, 10-year-olds.

“For every 10 women rescued, there are 50 to 100 more women who are brought in by the traffickers. Unfortunately, they’re not 18- or 20-year-olds anymore,” noted a 25-year-old victim of trafficking. “They’re minors as young as 13 who are being trafficked. They’re little girls.”

Where did this appetite for young girls come from?

Look around you.

Young girls have been sexualized for years now in music videos, on billboards, in television ads, and in clothing stores. Marketers have created a demand for young flesh and a ready supply of over-sexualized children.

“All it takes is one look at [certain social media] photos of teens to see examples—if they aren’t imitating porn they’ve actually seen, they’re imitating the porn-inspired images and poses they’ve absorbed elsewhere,” writes Jessica Bennett for Newsweek. “Latex, corsets and stripper heels, once the fashion of porn stars, have made their way into middle and high school.”

This is what Bennett refers to as the “pornification of a generation.”

“In a market that sells high heels for babies and thongs for tweens, it doesn’t take a genius to see that sex, if not porn, has invaded our lives,” concludes Bennett. “Whether we welcome it or not, television brings it into our living rooms and the Web brings it into our bedrooms. According to a 2007 study from the University of Alberta, as many as 90 percent of boys and 70 percent of girls aged 13 to 14 have accessed sexually explicit content at least once.”

In other words, the culture is grooming these young people to be preyed upon by sexual predators. And then we wonder why our young women are being preyed on, trafficked and abused?

Social media makes it all too easy. As one news center reported, “Finding girls is easy for pimps. They look on MySpace, Facebook, and other social networks. They and their assistants cruise malls, high schools and middle schools. They pick them up at bus stops. On the trolley. Girl-to-girl recruitment sometimes happens.”Foster homes and youth shelters have also become prime targets for traffickers.

Rarely do these girls enter into prostitution voluntarily. Many start out as runaways or throwaways, only to be snatched up by pimps or larger sex rings. Others, persuaded to meet up with a stranger after interacting online through one of the many social networking sites, find themselves quickly initiated into their new lives as sex slaves.

Debbie, a straight-A student who belonged to a close-knit Air Force family living in Phoenix, Ariz., is an example of this trading of flesh. Debbie was 15 when she was snatched from her driveway by an acquaintance-friend. Forced into a car, Debbie was bound and taken to an unknown location, held at gunpoint and raped by multiple men. She was then crammed into a small dog kennel and forced to eat dog biscuits. Debbie’s captors advertised her services on Craigslist. Those who responded were often married with children, and the money that Debbie “earned” for sex was given to her kidnappers. The gang raping continued. After searching the apartment where Debbie was held captive, police finally found Debbie stuffed in a drawer under a bed. Her harrowing ordeal lasted for 40 days.

While Debbie was fortunate enough to be rescued, others are not so lucky. According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, nearly 800,000 children go missing every year (roughly 2,185 children a day).

With a growing demand for sexual slavery and an endless supply of girls and women who can be targeted for abduction, this is not a problem that’s going away anytime soon.

For those trafficked, it’s a nightmare from beginning to end.

Those being sold for sex have an average life expectancy of seven years, and those years are a living nightmare of endless rape, forced drugging, humiliation, degradation, threats, disease, pregnancies, abortions, miscarriages, torture, pain, and always the constant fear of being killed or, worse, having those you love hurt or killed.

Peter Landesman paints the full horrors of life for those victims of the sex trade in his New York Times article “The Girls Next Door”:

Andrea told me that she and the other children she was held with were frequently beaten to keep them off-balance and obedient. Sometimes they were videotaped while being forced to have sex with adults or one another. Often, she said, she was asked to play roles: the therapist patient or the obedient daughter. Her cell of sex traffickers offered three age ranges of sex partners–toddler to age 4, 5 to 12 and teens–as well as what she called a “damage group.” “In the damage group, they can hit you or do anything they want to,” she explained. “Though sex always hurts when you are little, so it’s always violent, everything was much more painful once you were placed in the damage group.”

What Andrea described next shows just how depraved some portions of American society have become. “They’d get you hungry then to train you” to have oral sex. “They put honey on a man. For the littlest kids, you had to learn not to gag. And they would push things in you so you would open up better. We learned responses. Like if they wanted us to be sultry or sexy or scared. Most of them wanted you scared. When I got older, I’d teach the younger kids how to float away so things didn’t hurt.”

Immigration and customs enforcement agents at the Cyber Crimes Center in Fairfax, Va., report that when it comes to sex, the appetites of many Americans have now changed. What was once considered abnormal is now the norm. These agents are tracking a clear spike in the demand for harder-core pornography on the Internet. As one agent noted, “We’ve become desensitized by the soft stuff; now we need a harder and harder hit.”

This trend is reflected by the treatment many of the girls receive at the hands of the drug traffickers and the men who purchase them. Peter Landesman interviewed Rosario, a Mexican woman who had been trafficked to New York and held captive for a number of years. She said: “In America, we had ‘special jobs.’ Oral sex, anal sex, often with many men. Sex is now more adventurous, harder.”

A common thread woven through most survivors’ experiences is being forced to go without sleep or food until they have met their sex quota of at least 40 men. One woman recounts how her trafficker made her lie face down on the floor when she was pregnant and then literally jumped on her back, forcing her to miscarry.

Holly Austin Smith was abducted when she was 14 years old, raped, and then forced to prostitute herself. Her pimp, when brought to trial, was only made to serve a year in prison.

Barbara Amaya was repeatedly sold between traffickers, abused, shot, stabbed, raped, kidnapped, trafficked, beaten, and jailed all before she was 18 years old. “I had a quota that I was supposed to fill every night. And if I didn’t have that amount of money, I would get beat, thrown down the stairs. He beat me once with wire coat hangers, the kind you hang up clothes, he straightened it out and my whole back was bleeding.”

As David McSwane recounts in a chilling piece for the Herald-Tribune: “In Oakland Park, an industrial Fort Lauderdale suburb, federal agents in 2011 encountered a brothel operated by a married couple. Inside ‘The Boom Boom Room,’ as it was known, customers paid a fee and were given a condom and a timer and left alone with one of the brothel’s eight teenagers, children as young as 13. A 16-year-old foster child testified that he acted as security, while a 17-year-old girl told a federal judge she was forced to have sex with as many as 20 men a night.”

One particular sex trafficking ring catered specifically to migrant workers employed seasonally on farms throughout the southeastern states, especially the Carolinas and Georgia, although it’s a flourishing business in every state in the country. Traffickers transport the women from farm to farm, where migrant workers would line up outside shacks, as many as 30 at a time, to have sex with them before they were transported to yet another farm where the process would begin all over again.

This growing evil is, for all intents and purposes, out in the open.

Trafficked women and children are advertised on the internet, transported on the interstate, and bought and sold in swanky hotels.

Indeed, as I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, the government’s war on sex trafficking—much like the government’s war on terrorism, drugs and crime—has become a perfect excuse for inflicting more police state tactics (police check points, searches, surveillance, and heightened security) on a vulnerable public, while doing little to make our communities safer.

So what can you do?

Educate yourselves and your children about this growing menace in our communities.

Stop feeding the monster: Sex trafficking is part of a larger continuum in America that runs the gamut from homelessness, poverty, and self-esteem issues to sexualized television, the glorification of a pimp/ho culture—what is often referred to as the pornification of America—and a billion dollar sex industry built on the back of pornography, music, entertainment, etc.

This epidemic is largely one of our own making, especially in a corporate age where the value placed on human life takes a backseat to profit. It is estimated that the porn industry brings in more money than Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Yahoo.

Call on your city councils, elected officials and police departments to make the battle against sex trafficking a top priority, more so even than the so-called war on terror and drugs and the militarization of law enforcement.

Stop prosecuting adults for victimless “crimes” such as growing lettuce in their front yard and focus on putting away the pimps and buyers who victimize these young women.

Finally, the police need to do a better job of training, identifying and responding to these issues; communities and social services need to do a better job of protecting runaways, who are the primary targets of traffickers; legislators need to pass legislation aimed at prosecuting traffickers and “johns,” the buyers who drive the demand for sex slaves; and hotels need to stop enabling these traffickers, by providing them with rooms and cover for their dirty deeds.

That so many women and children continue to be victimized, brutalized and treated like human cargo is due to three things: one, a consumer demand that is increasingly lucrative for everyone involved—except the victims; two, a level of corruption so invasive on both a local and international scale that there is little hope of working through established channels for change; and three, an eerie silence from individuals who fail to speak out against such atrocities.

But the truth is that we are all guilty of contributing to this human suffering. The traffickers are guilty. The consumers are guilty. The corrupt law enforcement officials are guilty. The women’s groups who do nothing are guilty. The foreign peacekeepers and aid workers who contribute to the demand for sex slaves are guilty. Most of all, every individual who does not raise a hue and cry over the atrocities being committed against women and children in almost every nation around the globe—including the United States—is guilty.

Source: By John W. Whitehead | The Rutherford Institute

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Student Tackles Teacher For Confiscating His Phone While Others Watch

All you need to know about public education in America today.

Uber Driver Arrested for Raping Passengers

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39 year-old Uber Driver, Alfonso Alarconnunez Arrested for Raping Passengers

Source: San Luis Obispo Police Department, California

WHAT: Arrest for Sexual Assault and Residential Burglary

WHERE: City of Santa Maria

WHEN: January 17, 2018

DEPARTMENT CONTACT: Captain Chris Staley

On Wednesday January 17, 2018 Detectives from the San Luis Obispo Police Department served a search warrant at the home of 39 year-old Alfonso Alarconnunez in the 2300 block of Cesar Chavez, in the City of Santa Maria. Alarconnunez was identified as the suspect in two separate sexual assault cases which occurred in San Luis Obispo in the early morning hours of December 18th, 2017 and January 14th, 2018. Alarconnunez was arrested near his residence by SLO PD Detectives.

During an extensive investigation, Detectives learned that Alarconnunez is employed as an Uber driver and had provided service in the City of San Luis Obispo. The investigation revealed Alarconnunez was targeting intoxicated females and escorting them into their residences where he would then sexually assault them. In both of these cases it is believed Alarconnunez also stole items of property from the victims including cellular phones, computers, and jewelry. There were multiple victims identified in each of these cases.

Detectives believe Alarconnunez would search for parties in San Luis Obispo and solicit rides as an Uber driver. The investigation revealed Alarconnunez would collect payment through a Venmo pay service to disguise his identity and his Uber records.

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During the search warrant at Alarconnunez’s residence, Detectives found several items of property belonging to the victims in these sexual assaults and theft cases. Alarconnunez was booked into the San Luis Obispo County Jail for the below listed charges. His bail was set at $200,000.PC 261 (A) (4)- Rape of an Unconscious victim

PC 261 (A) (3)- Rape of an Intoxicated victim
PC 288 A (F)- Oral Copulation of an Intoxicated victim
PC 459 – Residential Burglary

San Luis Obispo Police Detectives are continuing their investigation involving Alarconnunez. Anyone who has information regarding Alfonso Alarconnunez, or believes they were a victim of assault or theft, are asked to notify the appropriate law enforcement agency in their jurisdiction.

The San Luis Obispo Police Department would like to make the public aware of the positive services being provided by Uber and Lyft drivers. These are legitimate and responsible services which provide a benefit to members of our community who are seeking a safe alternative mode of transportation. When using these services, customers should confirm the identity of the driver and the vehicle they request through the Uber or Lyft application before getting in a vehicle. Payment should also be made through the Uber and/or Lyft company and not another pay service company.

Source: EdHat

Once Glamorous Acapulco, Is Now Mexico’s Murder Capital

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ACAPULCO, Mexico — From the crescent bay and swaying palms, the taxi drivers of Acapulco need just 10 minutes to reach this other, plundered world.

Here, in a neighborhood called Renacimiento, a pharmacy is smeared with gang graffiti. Market stalls are charred by fire. Taco stands and dentists’ offices, hair salons and auto-body workshops – all stand empty behind roll-down metal gates.

On Friday afternoons, however, the parking lot at the Oxxo convenience store in this brutalized barrio buzzes to life. Dozens of taxi drivers pull up. It’s time to pay the boys.

When the three young gunmen drive up in a white Nissan Tsuru, Armando, a 55-year-old cabbie, scribbles his four-digit taxi number on a scrap of paper, folds it around a 100-peso note and slips it into their black plastic bag. This is his weekly payment to Acapulco’s criminal underworld – about $5, or roughly half what he earns in a day.

“They have the power,” said Armando, who identified himself only by his first name because he feared reprisal. “They can do whatever they want.”

For each of the past five years, Acapulco has been the deadliest city in Mexico, in a marathon of murder that has hollowed out the hillside neighborhoods and sprawling colonias that tourists rarely visit. And yet, the term “drug war” only barely describes what is going on here.

The dominant drug cartel in Acapulco and the state of Guerrero broke up a decade ago. The criminals now in charge resemble neighborhood gangs – with names like 221 or Los Locos. An estimated 20 or more of these groups operate in Acapulco, intermixed with representatives from larger drug cartels who contract them for jobs. The gang members are young men who often become specialists – extortionists, kidnappers, car thieves, assassins – and prey on a largely defenseless population.

“They kill barbers, tailors, mechanics, tinsmiths, taxi drivers,” said Joaquin Badillo, who runs a private security company in the city. “This has turned into a monster with 100 heads.”

Mexico is halfway through what may become the bloodiest year in its recent history, with more than 12,000 murders in the first six months of 2017. June was the deadliest month in the past two decades of consistent Mexican government statistics.

There are many theories on why violence, which dropped for two years after the 2012 election of President Enrique Peña Nieto, has roared back: competition for the domain of captured kingpins; the breakdown of secret agreements between criminals and politicians; a judicial reform requiring more evidence to lock up suspected lawbreakers; the growing American demand for heroin, meth and synthetic opiates. Whatever the primary cause, the result has been terrifying – a disintegration of order across growing swaths of this country.

Violence is spreading to new places and taking many forms. In Puebla, south of Mexico City, a fight rages over the sale of stolen fuel. Beach towns such as Cancun and Playa del Carmen have been bloodied by drug killings. The battle for human-smuggling routes leaves bodies strewn along the migrant trail.

In Acapulco, the faded playground of Hollywood stars, where the Kennedys honeymooned and John Wayne basked in the clifftop breeze, drugs are no longer even the main story. This is a place awash in crime of all stripes, where criminals no longer have to hide.

When Evaristo opened his restaurant along Acapulco’s seaside strip 15 years ago, drugs were plentiful, and that was just fine with him. Acapulco has always been a party town, and became a transit point for U.S.-bound Colombian cocaine and the opium poppy that bloomed along with marijuana in the state’s highlands. The dominant traffickers were the Beltran Leyva brothers of the Sinaloa Cartel.

“What the Beltran Leyvas were doing was selling drugs,” said Evaristo, who identified himself only by his first name, for fear of reprisal. “But they left us alone.”

For Evaristo, and many other Acapulco residents, the city’s descent into lawlessness began with the events at La Garita. A brazen January 2006 shootout in that central neighborhood left flaming vehicles and bodies in the street and became part of the city’s lore, as much as the iconic cliff divers and the Hollywood stars who once passed through town.

That gun battle also made one thing clear: National-level cartels were active in Acapulco – in this case the Sinaloa cartel, allied with the Beltran Leyvas, and the expansionist Zetas. And they were willing to use tremendous violence against each other.

“That’s when all this began,” Evaristo recalled.

Over the next decade, as then-President Felipe Calderón declared war on organized crime, Mexican security forces and their U.S. allies picked off cartel bosses and kingpins, splintering their organizations.

In Acapulco, the result has become a kaleidoscope of feuding criminals. After the killing of a powerful Beltran Leyva brother in 2009, rival factions emerged, with names like the Independent Cartel of Acapulco, the South Pacific Cartel and La Barredora. Contenders joined the fray from ascendant heroin-trafficking groups and crime organizations from other cities.

With the loss of all-powerful cartel bosses who had tightly controlled their criminal empires, drug gangs moved increasingly into other crimes, such as kidnapping and extortion.

Some 2,000 businesses have closed in the past few years, according to trade associations, driven away by crime and a withering economy. The bulk of the devastation has come in the poorer, inland neighborhoods, but the tourist strip has not been spared. Gone are Hooters and the Hard Rock Cafe, along with famed local spots such as El Alebrije nightclub and Plaza Las Peroglas, a shopping mall. An accountant whose clients included restaurant owners, doctors, and mechanics said that about 70 percent of them had closed their businesses in the past year because of extortion.

“Today, in Acapulco, this problem has given us mass psychosis,” said Alejandro Martinez Sidney, president of the Federation of Chambers of Commerce, Services and Tourism in Guerrero, which represents more than 8,000 businesses. “We are frozen, waiting for someone to come and demand our money.”

Last September, five gunmen walked into Evaristo’s restaurant, asking for the phone number of the owner. After he said he wouldn’t pay extortion, the men returned and put their guns to the heads of the staff, saying they would burn down the restaurant with everyone inside it, the restaurant owner recalled.

Since then, Evaristo has paid 40,000 pesos per month (about $2,200).

He has cut back on advertising and maintenance to cover the payments. Two of his private security guards were riddled with bullets from a passing car one night in May and survived the attack. If this keeps up, he will close down.

“My life is at risk,” Evaristo said.

Mexico’s crime gangs have not just proliferated, they behave differently than in past decades. Cartels were once based on family ties and known for maintaining strict hierarchies that rewarded members’ loyalty with promotion through the ranks.

The newer generations of criminal gangs operate more like a “wheel network,” a web of contacts who ally at times but also work independently, said Cecilia Farfán, a scholar at the Instituto Tecnologico Autonomy de Mexico, or ITAM, who specializes in organized crime and is doing research in Acapulco.

If these quasi-independent cells get disrupted, the larger network can still function, and “the intelligence that a cell can provide to law enforcement or rival organizations is limited,” Farfán wrote in her recently completed dissertation.

Criminals have begun to show less allegiance to a single organization – acting more like freelance subcontractors.

“They hire you for your expertise; they’re not going to develop you as a human resource,” Farfán said about how street-level criminals are used. “They’re not investing in you, and you’re not invested in them, either.”

The victims of Acapulco’s violence come in many forms: those caught in feuds between criminal bands; businessmen who don’t pay extortion; those who cross the invisible boundaries between drug gang territory. The situation has become so confused – with criminals staking out overlapping domains – that residents often complain about being forced to pay off two or three different groups. People die over mistaken identity or as bystanders.

On one recent night, an overflow crowd waited silently on sidewalk benches outside an Acapulco funeral parlor. Gerardo Flores Camarena, 57, a hotel bartender, couldn’t stay seated. He paced back and forth in anguish as he spoke into his cellphone.

“The killers thought they were from another group,” he told a relative. “They got confused. Can you imagine: confused.”

The day before, his brother, Ricardo, 42, an ambulance driver, and Gerardo’s two teenage grandsons had been found in the trunk of their Nissan Sentra. They had suffered a type of torture known as the “tourniquet”: wires cinched around their necks to the point of suffocation.

A note left with the bodies said this is what happens to car thieves. But the Nissan had belonged to the family.

“We feel powerless against what is happening in this city,” Flores said.

When Mayor Evodio Velázquez Aguirre took office in October 2015, he said, the municipal police force was “totally out of control.”

Half the 1,500 officers had failed federal vetting and background checks. The police had spent much of 2014 on strike to protest salaries and benefits, leaving state and federal forces in charge.

The mayor said that his administration has provided the police with life insurance, housing, new cameras and vehicles. There is also a new, separate tourist police force with jaunty uniforms to attend to travelers.

“Acapulco is on its feet,” the mayor said in an interview.

But last year, there were 918 killings in the city of 700,000, the most murders of any Mexican city for the fifth straight year. During the first half of this year, the government numbers track slightly lower – 412, compared with 466 in the same period in 2016 – although the local El Sur newspaper lists 466 murders for the most recent period.

Adm. Juan Guillermo Fierro Rocha, the commander in Acapulco for the Mexican navy, which has a critical role fighting cartels, told El Sur this month that criminals are lashing out because they are “cornered,” and that he expects a decrease soon.

But Mexican authorities have failed for years to halt Acapulco’s slide.

Some 5,000 security forces are in Acapulco, and the coastal sliver of hotels and restaurants brims with federal and state police, soldiers, marines and municipal forces. This attention to the tourist strip, however, leaves the vast majority of the city exposed, residents say.

Mexican police have been hobbled by corruption for decades, and Acapulco has been no exception. Alfredo Álvarez Valenzuela, who oversaw the Acapulco police for five months until May 2014, told the Mexican newspaper Reforma last year: “The municipal police don’t work for organized crime; the municipal police are organized crime.”

But the problem goes beyond corruption. Mexican municipal police traditionally have had little training, low pay, poor equipment and little capacity to do investigations. Federal police and the army often lack street-level knowledge of cities and their crime gangs.

Juan Salgado, an expert on police reform at CIDE, a Mexican research center, said that police are reluctant to visit some neighborhoods in Acapulco because they are outgunned and frightened.

“I’m not sure if crime would increase if the whole municipal police department in Acapulco disappeared,” Salgado said. “They are so inefficient in stopping crime I don’t think it would make a huge difference.”

Meanwhile, many people refuse to press charges out of concern the information will leak back to their tormentors. That makes investigating crimes all the more difficult.

On a recent afternoon, a man wearing a cowboy hat and carrying an assault rifle stood in plain sight on the main boulevard in the Emiliano Zapata neighborhood, five miles from Acapulco Bay.

At his feet on the pavement lay another young man, barefoot and curled in the fetal position, his hair matted with blood. The man with the assault rifle kicked him repeatedly and savagely, then walked calmly back to his white pickup truck. A federal police truck rolled past, but it didn’t stop.

Taxi drivers operate at the intersection of Acapulco’s troubles: They have a shrinking number of tourists as clients, and navigate more dangerous streets. Some have become part of the crime world themselves, working as gang spotters (voluntarily or under duress), or moving drugs or weapons in their cars. When a rival gang tries to take over a neighborhood, its members often kill taxi drivers “in an effort to blind the established organization,” Chris Kyle, an anthropologist and expert on Guerrero based at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, wrote in an affidavit for an Acapulco taxi driver applying for asylum in the United States.

More than 130 taxi drivers were slain in Acapulco last year, making them about eight times more likely to get murdered than the average city resident.

Teens with guns often commandeer taxis in Renacimiento for hours or days. They burn taxis to enforce their warnings. Guillermo Perez, 40, a taxi driver, putters around the neighborhood in a 1995 Volkswagen Beetle, its windshield cracked and upholstery ripped out, leaving his newer car hidden at home. He no longer picks up strangers, driving only clients he knows.

“People are terrified,” he said.

Years ago, ferrying around tourists used to be enjoyable, he said, even lucrative work -$100 for a day shift, more at night.

“It was so different: It was Acapulco,” he said. “People were out in the streets. We all lived from tourism.”

The wealthy can leave or build homes with elaborate security systems, but the poor are exposed. And so Perez, like many of the 20,000 taxi drivers in Acapulco, pays his weekly fee for protection, even though he receives none.

“If 100 pesos a week is what it costs to stay alive,” he said, “I’ll pay.”

Source: The Mercury News

Ken Block Takes On Swing Arm City

For the latest instalment of the wildly popular Gymkhana series, Ken Block teamed up with Pennzoil and took his Hoonigan-powered 600hp Ford Fiesta ST RX43 to the sand dunes of Swing Arm City, Utah.

Terrakhana is the latest addition to Block’s ongoing series that has been collectively viewed over 400 million times. Filmed in the summer, the conditions were challenging with Swing Arm City at an elevation of 4300 ft and ambient temperatures of 102° F. Needless to stay the results were still awesome and Block continues to push the limits of his Ford Fiesta.

Below you can watch the latest instalment as well as see some stills from Terrakhana, enjoy!

 

Bruce Jenner Reveals He’s Had Gender Reassignment Surgery in New Memoir

“I was so tired of tucking the damn thing in all the time … “

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You can cut off whatever body part you want and change your pronouns. Doesn’t change your DNA.

From Yahoo: Much of Caitlyn Jenners transition has been up for public consumption, but the Olympian managed the seemingly impossible: She underwent gender reassignment surgery in January of this year, and nobody suspected a thing until she revealed it to the world herself.

Jenner, 67, shares and bares all in her upcoming memoir, The Secrets of My Life, due out April 25 — and it’s there that she talks about the experience for what, she writes, will be the first and last time.

“I just want to have all the right parts. I am also tired of tucking the damn thing in all the time,” she explains, adding that she was excited to realize she’d be living authentically for the first time in her life. “The surgery was a success, and I feel not only wonderful, but liberated.”

She continues, “I am going to have an enthusiasm for life that I have not had in 39 years since the Olympics, almost two thirds of my life.”

In the book excerpt obtained by RadarOnline.comJenner reveals she finally made the full transition after being annoyed by fans asking intrusive questions about her genitals. But that doesn’t mean fans have the right to continue to pester her about it. As she says in the book, “You want to know, so now you know. Which is why this is the first time, and the last time, I will ever speak of it.”

Jenner’s upcoming tome netted a huge advance — $4 million, to be exact — and she worked on it with Friday Night Lights author Buzz Bissinger, who also wrote the Vanity Fair profile that introduced Caitlyn to the world. Jenner’s life has certainly exploded since she revealed her transition to Diane Sawyer on 20/20 just two years ago this month.

“For all intents and purposes, I am a woman,” she told Sawyer. “My brain is much more female than it is male. That’s what my soul is. Bruce lives a lie. She is not a lie. I can’t do it anymore.”

Which is why gender reassignment was a natural next step. As Jenner continued to embrace her new form, she found she had no use for anything that was associated with her old self. As she writes about the choice to undergo surgery, “So why even consider it? Because it’s just a penis. It has no special gifts or use for me other than what I have said before, the ability to take a whiz in the woods.”

Of course, the more public aspect of Jenner’s transition from Bruce to Caitlyn continued long after her interview with Sawyer, including her groundbreaking Vanity Fair cover story and photo shoot in June 2015, which Jenner likened to being better than winning a gold medal. She became active on Twitter soon afterward, and now boasts nearly 4 million followers. That July marked the debut of her E! reality show, I Am Cait, which was canceled after two seasons. Jenner officially changed her name in September 2015.

Previously, Jenner was reluctant to discuss gender reassignment — even going so far as to shoot down any comments on it in her Sports Illustrated appearance last June. “It’s nobody’s business whether I want to do that to my body,” she told SI. But she did admit that “Little Caitlyn” had been inside her since her youth, and it took a long time for her to come to terms with it.

“Sometimes she raised her cute little head more than others. I was female inside, but I wasn’t an effeminate male. So I could hide easily in the male world,” Jenner said of that period of her life. “My life was distraction after distraction after distraction. Being a macho male was a way for me to try to convince myself that the woman living inside of me really isn’t living inside me.

“It disgusted me,” Jenner said of her male body. “I was big and thick and masculine. The rest of the world thought it was this Greek god kind of body. I hated it. But it’s what I was given, so I just tried to do the best I could with it.

But now that she’s undergone gender reassignment surgery, Jenner can truly live freely as her authentic self. Congratulations, Caitlyn! Now let’s respect her wishes and never speak of this again.

Source: Fellowship Of The Minds

Report From Ash Wednesday Eve

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So I Went Out To Eat Last Night and A Group of Champagne Communists Sat Down at the Next Table…

Last night being the last night before Lent, I went out to dinner for one last round of my favorite yum-yums and slurp-slurps.  As I walked in, I saw a very well-dressed middle aged man who projected anger and misery from every pore sitting alone.  I was seated at the table directly adjacent.  Sure enough, he was extremely nasty to the staff, as they offered him something while he waited for the rest of his party to arrive.

A few minutes later, in walk three more well-dressed middle-aged men, one of which was a flaming queen.  The other two men, I could hear, were not American. I overheard later that one was Swiss and the other German. A few minutes later, a middle-aged Jew, well-dressed and wearing a yarmulke, walks in carrying a plastic bag filled with Ziplock plastic containers.  I sat there thinking, “Oh no.  No, no, no.  He didn’t bring his own FOOD up in here, did he?”  Yup. He gave the bag to the manager and sniffed instructions about heating it up.  So, let me get this straight.  You are SUCH a pious, devout Jew that you can’t eat ANYTHING except your own super-special “ritually pure” food, but you can sit at table with a flaming sodomite?  Sorry, gotta call bullshit on that bullshit right there.

So the party has now arrived.  It turns out there had been some sort of a symposium for lawyers to discuss “international law” (read “power politics”) at a nearby university.  All five were law school professors and presenters at the symposium.  Mister Miserable, it turns out, is a law professor at Columbia who lives in – his words here – “gentrified Harlem, VERY close to the Clinton Offices on 125th Street…” (The other four ooohed and ahhhhed at this.)

At this point I took out my phone and started taking notes, because what was sitting next to me was a table of Champagne Communist “thought leaders”, three American and two European. Ho ho ho. This should be FASCINATING.

The faggot did something that I have never before heard.  He referred to his sodomite partner as his “wife”, but referred to him as “he” and “him”.  I guess at this point, it is all about removing all possible meaning from language for these wretches.

So, let’s get started.  Everything below is paraphrase.  It was all I could do to keep up the note-taking without it being obvious that I was taking notes on their conversation and not “chatting” with someone on my phone.

Topic 1: Nationalism is bad and must be completely purged from humanity.

The Swiss law professor went on a rant about how “deeply engrained” the scourge of Nationalism is in the human mind, citing Switzerland as his example.  Switzerland contains four separate groups: German, French, Italian and Romansh. And even though it is a tiny country, very politically and socially liberal, with four discreet cultural groups with DIFFERENT LANGUAGES, all the Swiss people STILL, he lamented bitterly, identify as SWISS.  If the Swiss all still have this deep Nationalistic pride and identity, imagine how much harder it will be to purge Nationalism from the Germans, or, THE FRENCH!

Topic 2: Typical woman…

They then started talking about the speakers at the conference.  One was a Dutch female law professor.  “Is she straight?” “Yeah, she’s straight. And she expects to be submitted to because of her gender!”

I laughed out loud.

Topic 3:  Law by Stealth

The fag then began to hold forth on how much appreciated the presentation of the Swiss guy, particularly the tactic of “Law By Stealth”, and how well that concept “fits in with our project”.  Indeed.  Also with Bergoglio’s project.  Law By Stealth.  It’s their own term, kids.  Start using it.  That is what all of this crap is.

Topic 4: Was he a threat?

The fag then asked the table who “the man in the back, with the long hair, that asked the questions” was.  Someone answered, “He’s English”. The fag then asked, “Is he a threat?”  Because people who ask substantive questions are “a threat”.

Topic 5: The Goal Is Global Fascism

The Swiss lawyer, it turns out, also has a private practice. When the Fag started talking about how all “private law” is really just a subset of the “imperial governmental” paradigm, and cited ICANN as his example, the Swiss came right out and said that the only possible model is total global control of all trade and businesses. Global Fascism.  He said the “biggest player” is the “OMNIPOTENT REGULATOR”, which can be the “good company”, that is a company that is fully controlled by and submissive to the state, “that is so powerful” that it becomes the de facto regulator.  His example?  You guessed it: Apple.

Topic 6: Human rights – Fascist style

The Swiss then, in the context of Apple, assured the table that with regards to human rights, “they only do it for the public perception”.  The point being, since Apple is “omnipotent”, they are their own regulator, and they decide what their human rights regulations will be.  Then the grumpy Columbia professor chimed in: Apple absolutely breaks the law in Asia, but we (the former U.S.) are fine with that, because it is all “handled between friends”.  Apple is for the “greater good” – that is the globalist-fascist agenda – so “why not let them flex their power?”

Feeling nauseated yet?

Topic 7: Something minor…

I missed the context of this quote, but I darn sure recorded the punchline.  Someone said, “What are they protecting?” The Swiss replied, “Their sovereignty or something.  Something minor.” And it wasn’t a joke.  He was dead serious.

Topic 8: The flaw in the current EU system is…

The German said, “In terms of the EU, WE DECIDE.”  Yeah, we noticed, Franz.

Then Columbia said, “In joining the EU, didn’t the Danes give legal supremacy to the EU?”

Then the Swiss said, “The Parliament is technically supreme, so the flaw is that there is no supreme EU norm.  Denmark has a constitution, yes, de jure, but it is meaningless, de facto.

Topic 9: Free market competition should only be allowed if I benefit from it personally…

Columbia Commie then started talking about how it cost his $100 to take a cab from JFK airport to Harlem, but if he used Uber, it only cost $35, and thus “I always take Uber.” The Fag then said, “I always take the bus.” Columbia Commie then replied, dripping with sarcasm, “Don’t worry.  I won’t tell. It’s your contribution to the “fight against global warming”. At this, the table exploded into laughter.

Topic 10: We Must Make Our Own State…

The Swiss said, “The solution to all of this is to separate.  We must make our own state.”  At this, the Jew piped up and said, “So, the “Two State Solution?” At which the table again ERUPTED into uproarious laughter. That was the biggest laugh of the night, by far.

Well, that’s Part 1.  Check back for Part 2….

By Ann Barnhardt