Tag Archives: Facial Recognition

Beijing Launches New Rule: Residents Must Pass Facial Recognition Test to Surf Internet

(Nicole Hao) The Chinese regime announced a new rule which requires residents to pass a facial recognition test in order to apply for an internet connection via smartphone or computer.

A woman uses a facial recognition device installed at a self-service supermarket in Tianjin, China on Aug. 21, 2019. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

The rule will be implemented from Dec. 1, 2019. In addition, no cell phone or landline number can be transferred to another person privately.

This is an upgraded restriction after the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) required all applicants to present a valid ID and personal information to register for a cell phone or a landline number since January 2015.

New Rule:

MIIT published the new rule on its official website and distributed it to all telecom carriers on Sept. 27, which includes three main requests.

First, all telecom carriers MUST use facial recognition to test whether an applicant who applies for internet connection is the owner of the ID that they use since Dec. 1. At the same time, the carriers must test that the ID is genuine and valid.

Second, all telecom carriers MUST upgrade their service’s terms and conditions and notify all their customers that they are not allowed to transfer or resell their cell phone SIM card to another person by the end of November 2019.

Third, telecom carriers should help their customers to check whether there are cell phone or landline numbers that don’t belong to them but registered under their names since Dec. 1. For unidentified numbers, the telecom carries MUST investigate and close the lines immediately.

MIIT said in the notice that it will arrange for supervisors to check each telecom carrier’s performance, and will arrange inspections to make sure all carriers will follow the rule strictly.

Purpose:

“The reason why the Chinese regime asks people to register their real identities to surf the internet is because it wants to control people’s speech,” U.S.-based commentator Tang Jingyuan told The Epoch Times on Sept. 27.

Authorities arrested hundreds of Chinese people in recent years because they posted a topic that the regime deemed sensitive, including the most recent Hong Kong protests.

“MIIT’s new rule on using facial recognition to identify an internet user means the government can easily track their online activities, including their social media posts and websites they visit,” Tang said.“Then these people become scared of sharing their real opinions online because their comments could anger the authorities and they could get arrested for it.”

Tang concluded: “I think MIIT’s new rule takes away freedom of speech from Chinese people completely.”

Facial Recognition in China:

The Chinese regime has used facial recognition systems to monitor people for several years now. In cities and public spaces such as train stations, airports, government buildings, and entrances of museums, police use smart glasses to check each passerby’s identity and whether they have a criminal record.

On the streets, millions of surveillance cameras capture and track people’s movements.

At crosswalks, facial recognition systems record jaywalkers, who are then fined 20 yuan ($2.81), and docked points on their social credit score. The Chinese regime’s social credit system assigns each citizen a score of social “trustworthiness.” A person with a low social credit score may not be allowed to board a train or airplane, or their child may not be admitted to a reputable school.

Inside classrooms, facial recognition technology monitors each student and reports their actions to the teacher and parents.

Even inside public restrooms, tourists and residents have to use facial recognition system to get toilet paper.

The Chinese regime hopes to install enough surveillance cameras to cover the entire country.

According to the latest report of U.S. based market research firm IDC, China spent $10.6 billion on video surveillance equipment in 2018, and spending will reach $20.1 billion in 2023. 64.3 percent of the spending in 2018 accounted for surveillance cameras.

IDC reported on Jan. 30 that it predicted China would have 2.76 billion surveillance cameras installed in 2022. 

Source: by Nicole Hao | Epic Times

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Report: Amazon’s Facial Recognition System Identifies California Lawmakers as Criminals

According to a test by the ACLU, Amazon’s facial recognition system incorrectly identified one in five California lawmakers were incorrectly identified as criminals by the software.

Vice News reports that Amazon’s facial recognition software, Rekognition, incorrectly identified 26 California lawmakers as people arrested for crimes during a test of the software by the ACLU of Northern California. The software was used by the ACLU to scan 120 photos of lawmakers against a database of 25,000 photos of individuals who were arrested, according to ACLU lawyer Matt Cagle.

The test found that one in five California lawmakers were falsely associated with mugshots from the arrest database, exposing the issues with implementing facial recognition technology in law enforcement services. The Rekognition software reportedly matched the lawmakers to mugshot photos with a confidence rate of 80 percent.

Assembly member Phil Ting was one of the individuals incorrectly identified as a criminal by the software. He is also a lawmaker who has been calling for the limiting of facial recognition technology for some time, introducing a bill in February which would ban the use of facial recognition and biometric surveillance system on police-worn body cameras.

Amazon stated that it encourages police to use 99 percent confidence ratings for public safety users stating:  “First, you should use confidence thresholds of 99% or higher to reduce errors and false positives,” in a guide for law enforcement states. In a blog post in February, Amazon stated:

“When using facial recognition to identify persons of interest in an investigation, law enforcement should use the recommended 99% confidence threshold, and only use those predictions as one element of the investigation (not the sole determinant).”

But Cagle stated in an email that Amazon’s 99 percent confidence threshold is not representative of how the technology is used in real-life situations. “In the real world, Amazon does not consider the failure to use a 99 confidence score to be irresponsible and a prominent law enforcement customer for Rekognition has acknowledged lowering and not using any score at all, according to news reports,”Cagle stated, citing a report from Gizmodo in which police stated that they do not set a confidence threshold.

At the press conference, Assembly member Ting stated:

“If you get falsely accused of an arrest, what happens?. It could impact your ability to get employment, it absolutely impacts your ability to get housing. There are real people who could have real impacts.”

Source: by Lucas Nolan | Breitbart

China Uses Facial Recognition to Fence People In

https://i1.wp.com/www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/facial-recognition-technology.jpg

China’s state surveillance apparatus is trying out a new tool in one of its favorite test beds, the restive region of Xinjiang.

The Muslim-dominated villages on China’s western frontier are testing facial-recognition systems that alert authorities when targeted people venture more than 300 meters (1,000 feet) beyond designated “safe areas,” according to a person familiar with the project. The areas comprise individuals’ homes and workplaces, said the person, who requested anonymity to speak to the media without authorization.

“A system like this is obviously well-suited to controlling people,” said Jim Harper, executive vice president of the libertarian-leaning Competitive Enterprise Institute and a founding member of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee. “‘Papers, please’ was the symbol of living under tyranny in the past. Now, government officials don’t need to ask.”

The alert project is another example of how Xinjiang — a region boarding Pakistan and Afghanistan that’s home to about 10 million Muslim ethnic Uighurs — has become a laboratory for technologies that track large groups simultaneously. Spurred on by President Xi Jinping’s orders to “strike first against Islamist extremism after deadly attacks involving Uighurs in 2013 and 2014, as well as reports of some fighting in Syria, the region has become one of the world’s most heavily policed places.

Land of Checkpoints

The Alaska-sized Xinjiang is a land of checkpoints, police stations and security cameras. Local governments have been ordering residents to install satellite-tracking systems in their cars. People must submit to facial scans to enter markets, buy fuel or visit places such as the capital Urumqi’s main bus terminal.

Xinjing’s regional publicity department didn’t respond to faxed requests for comment this week. The Ministry of Public Security in Beijing also didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Facial recognition is a big part of China’s two-year-old domestic surveillance upgrade campaign called Xue Liang, a reference to a Chinese idiom about the public’s collective observation power. While other countries are experimenting with the technology — the Federal Bureau of Investigation is, for instance, developing a database of Americans’ photographs — China is at the vanguard.

Surveillance Technology

The country is on track to represent 46 percent of the $17.3 billion global video surveillance market by year-end, and three-quarters of all deep learning-enabled servers for analyzing the data, according to Jon Cropley, a senior principal analyst at IHS Markit. All told, China earmarked 938 billion yuan ($146 billion) for domestic security in 2015 — the last time such figures were released — more than its military budget at the time.

The Xinjiang alert project is being led by China Electronics Technology Group, a state-run defense contractor that has parlayed its experience building radar and space systems into domestic security initiatives, the person said. It’s part of the Beijing-based company’s effort to develop software to collate data on jobs, hobbies, consumption habits, and other behavior of ordinary citizens to predict terrorist acts before they occur.

China Electronics Technology Group didn’t respond to an emailed request for comment.

‘Separatist’ Forces

Establishing control over Xinjiang — located closer to Baghdad than Beijing — has vexed China since an emperor sat in the capital. The current Communist Party-led government blames “separatist” forces that reject Chinese rule for fomenting unrest.

China accelerated efforts to upgrade security technology after Uighurs were blamed for deadly attacks far from Xinjiang in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square and train stations in Guangzhou and Kunming. Last year, Xi called on law enforcement officials to “actively use modern scientific and technological measures” and “safeguard national security and social stability,” the official People’s Daily newspaper reported.

The Xinjiang alert system, which began testing early last year, is focused on the southern half of the region, the person familiar with the project said. That includes Kashgar, an ancient Silk Road junction that Xi envisions playing a key role in his updated version of the Asia-Europe trade route, the “Belt and Road Initiative.”

Tracking Movements

While it’s unclear exactly which communities are covered by the alerts, almost four-fifths of southern Xinjiang’s population is of Uighur descent. China’s treatment of the ethnic minority, includingrestrictionson religious observances and the free movement of citizens, has been the subject of frequent criticism by the U.S. and European countries.

The alert project links security cameras to a database of people who have attracted the attention of authorities and tracks their movements within a particular area, the person said. Police can follow up by intercepting individuals or visiting their homes and questioning their friends and families.

Harper from the Competitive Enterprise Institute has been researching the potential adoption of facial recognition systems in America. He said such systems could make controlling large groups far less expensive.

“People will believe that they are being watched all the time,” Harper said. “And this will cause them to curtail their own freedom.”

Source: Stop White Genocide