Tag Archives: Hunting

An Old Cowboy, His Trusty Horse And Faithful Dog

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An old cowboy was riding his trusty horse followed by his faithful dog along an unfamiliar road. The cowboy was enjoying the new scenery when he suddenly remembered dying and realized the dog beside him had been dead for years as had his horse. Confused, he wondered what was happening and where the trail was leading them.

After a while, they came to a high, white stone wall that looked like fine marble. At the top of a long hill it was broken by a tall arch topped by a golden letter “H” that glowed in the sunlight. Standing before it he saw a magnificent gate in the arch that looked like mother-of-pearl and the road that led to the gate looked like gold.

He rode toward the gate and as he got close he saw a man at a desk to one side. Parched and tired out by his journey he called out;

“Excuse me, where are we?”  “This is Heaven sir”, the man answered.
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“Wow! Would you happen to have some water?”, the man asked. “Of course sir, come right in and I’ll have some ice water brought right up”.

As the gate began to open the cowboy asked, “can I bring my partners too?”  “I am sorry sir but we don’t accept pets”.

The cowboy thought for a moment, then turned back to the road and continued riding, his dog trotting by his side.

After another long ride, at the top of another hill, he came to a dirt road leading through a ranch gate that looked as if it had never been closed. As he approached the gate he saw a man inside leaning against a tree and reading a book.

“Excuse me,”, he called to the man. “Do you have any water?” “Sure, there’s a pump right over there, help yourself.”

“How about my friends here?”, the traveler gestured to the dog and his horse. “Of course!, they look thirsty too,” said the man.

The trio went through the gate and sure enough, there was an old-fashioned hand pump with buckets beside it. The traveler filled a cup and the buckets with wonderfully cool water and took a long drink, as did his horse and dog. When they were full, he walked back to the man who was still standing by the tree;

“What do you call this place?”, the traveler asked. “This is Heaven”, he answered.

“That’s confusing”, the traveler said. “The man down the road said that was Heaven too”.

“Oh, you mean the place with the glitzy, gold road and fake pearly gates?, that’s hell.”

“Doesn’t it make you angry when they use your name like that?” “Not at all. Actually, we’re happy they screen out the folks who would leave their best friends behind…”

A Russian Plane Zaps U.S. Warship’s Missile Defense System


by
Gary North

An unarmed Russian bomber in April flew over a high-tech U.S. ship. A crew member pressed a button. Poof! No more missile defense system on the ship. No more radar. The ship became a defenseless floating coffin.

Then the plane flew over the blind ship a dozen times. Basically, it was “Nyah, nyah, nyah.”

This story got no play in American media.

On 10 April 2014, the USS Donald Cook entered the waters of the Black Sea and on 12 April a Russian Su-24 tactical bomber flew over the vessel triggering an incident that, according to several media reports, completely demoralized its crew, so much so that the Pentagon issued a protest.

The USS Donald Cook (DDG-75) is a 4th generation guided missile destroyer whose key weapons are Tomahawk cruise missiles with a range of up to 2,500 kilometers, and capable of carrying nuclear explosives. This ship carries 56 Tomahawk missiles in standard mode, and 96 missiles in attack mode.

The US destroyer is equipped with the most recent Aegis Combat System. It is an integrated naval weapons systems which can link together the missile defense systems of all vessels embedded within the same network, so as to ensure the detection, tracking and destruction of hundreds of targets at the same time. In addition, the USS Donald Cook is equipped with 4 large radars, whose power is comparable to that of several stations. For protection, it carries more than fifty anti-aircraft missiles of various types.

Meanwhile, the Russian Su-24 that buzzed the USS Donald Cook carried neither bombs nor missiles but only a basket mounted under the fuselage, which, according to the Russian newspaper Rossiyskaya Gazeta, contained a Russian electronic warfare device called Khibiny.

As the Russian jet approached the US vessel, the electronic device disabled all radars, control circuits, systems, information transmission, etc. on board the US destroyer. In other words, the all-powerful Aegis system, now hooked up — or about to be — with the defense systems installed on NATO’s most modern ships was shut down, as turning off the TV set with the remote control.

The Russian Su-24 then simulated a missile attack against the USS Donald Cook, which was left literally deaf and blind. As if carrying out a training exercise, the Russian aircraft — unarmed — repeated the same maneuver 12 times before flying away.

After that, the 4th generation destroyer immediately set sail towards a port in Romania.

Since that incident, which the Atlanticist media have carefully covered up despite the widespread reactions sparked among defense industry experts, no US ship has ever approached Russian territorial waters again.

According to some specialized media, 27 sailors from the USS Donald Cook requested to be relieved from active service.

Vladimir Balybine — director of the research center on electronic warfare and the evaluation of so-called “visibility reduction” techniques attached to the Russian Air Force Academy — made the following comment: “The more a radio-electronic system is complex, the easier it is to disable it through the use of electronic warfare.”

In short, “back to the drawing board!”

Problem: it takes about seven years for the Pentagon to design and deploy a new cyber security system. As for missile guidance systems, it takes even longer.

If you want to know how much bang for the taxpayer’s buck the Pentagon gets, begin here.

This is blind man’s bluff. The Pentagon is the blind man.

The Pentagon’s strategy is to play dumb. “Incident? What incident?”

Congressional hearings? Don’t hold your breath.

Now Russia’s defense minister says that Russian bombers will soon start patrolling the Gulf of Mexico.

George H. W. Bush and NATO promised in 1990 that NATO would not be expanded to Russia’s borders. Then NATO broke the promise. It was mission creep by a bloated bureaucracy, whose original mission was to defend Western Europe for a few hours against an invasion by the USSR until the USA launched nuclear missiles on the USSR. That mission officially ended in 1991, when the USSR committed suicide.

Russian bombers in the Gulf? We are now seeing tit-for-tat. It is mission creep from the other side.

All those Pentagon bucks! So little bang!

Bowhead Whale May Be the Planet’s Oldest Living Mammal

https://i1.wp.com/media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/7d/56/6a/7d566ad2ad817b723c787e1f858c12de.jpgby Sean Breslin

Even though a massive storm became the strongest on record for the Bering Sea this week, there’s a creature in those seas that might have seen more punishing storms long before weather conditions were studied in that region of the world.

Some of these mammals are probably older than the novel “Moby-Dick” as well, which was released in 1851.

The Bowhead whale can live to be at least 200 years old, according to Smithsonian.com. It’s a dark-colored whale that can grow to 60 feet long and weigh as much as 60 tons, National Geographic says.

And the oldest of the living species survived a time when nearly every Bowhead whale was killed by fishermen. Yankee commercial whaling killed all but about 1,000 bowhead whales from 1848 to 1915, according to Alaska Dispatch News.

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Now, there are more than 14,000 of the animals alive, according to scientists’ estimates, and the surviving ancestors have been proven to be nearly two centuries old because of the primitive hunting tools found in some of their bodies, ADN adds.

Herman Melville wrote “Moby-Dick” after spending a brief period aboard a whaling ship, Smithsonian.com reports. None of Alaska’s whales are white, as was the albino sperm whale that stole the show in Melville’s novel, but it’s amazing to think that a living species of the mammal may have been crossed by the writer before he wrote that 163-year-old story.

These cold-water whales are easily among the oldest mammals on Earth, but it’s unclear if the Bowhead whale takes the crown for the eldest creature alive right now. Mother Nature Network says the oldest Bowhead whale lived to be 211 years old, but a tortoise named Adwaita was believed to be 250 years old at the time of its death in 2006.

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The Spike Series By Cold Steel

Spike Series

Cold Steel Bowie Spike Neck Knife, 53NBS. Entirely re-engineered in 2013, this Spike series continue to raise the bar for neck knives! Thin, light and super-tough, their razor sharp, zero ground blades, are complemented by heavily scalloped, textured handle scales that offer a comfortable, secure grip.
Integral quillons provide a safe stop for index finger and thumb, while the textured Faux G-10 provides excellent positive traction even when your hands are cold, wet and slippery.

Available in four distinctive blade shapes (Bowie, Drop Point, Tokyo and Tanto point) they offer all the strength of a solid steel one-piece construction (much stronger than any tactical folder and even rivaling the strength of some boot knives) while still being light enough to carry all day without fatigue.

The brand new Spike series come complete with all-new Secure-Ex sheaths that provide even greater retention and safety. Super lightweight (weighing in at 3oz. in the sheath!) the Spikes can be comfortably worn around the neck 24/7 by using the black bead lanyard provided, or carried on a waistband or belt by taking advantage of their new Tek-Lok™ compatible design.

Easily concealed, razor sharp and light as a feather — the Spike series by Cold Steel!

Good Alternative

How An Asian Country Beat Scotland To Become The World’s Best Whisky Maker


by Sonali Kohli

Famed international whiskey connoisseur Jim Murray releases his annual Whiskey Bible this month, and there’s something missing from the top five: a Scottish whiskey.

Instead, Japan’s Yamazaki Single Malt Sherry Cask 2013 took title of World Whiskey of the Year, making it the first Japanese whiskey to earn the accolade. Yamazaki is the flagship single malt for Suntory, the company that bought Beam, Inc. earlier this year for $13.6 billion to become the world’s third-largest distiller.

Murray, who gave the whiskey 97.5 out of 100 points, wrote that the Yamazaki has a “‘nose of exquisite boldness’ and finish of ‘light, teasing spice.”

A brief history of Yamazaki Distillery explains its rapid ascent among whiskey connoisseurs: It was the first whisky distillery in Japan, built in 1923 after World War I and headed by Masataka Taketsuru (who later went on to found competitor Nikka Whisky). Taketsuru, who brought Scottish whisky making to Japan, was a student of the Scottish brew. He studied the University of Glasglow and visited distilleries around the country to learn how the Scottish make the drink.

 How did Japan learn the Scottish craft better than, for instance, American distilleries that have spent centuries trying to make a name in the business?
 

New York Magazine’s Jordana Rothman points to the youth of Japan’s whiskey industry, which she says makes it “less shacked to tradition.” Yamazaki also has the benefit of its mineral water which “is treasured enough to be bottled and sold on its own.” Its wood barrels, meanwhile, are made of a native oak, Mizunara, which Rothman writes “impart an almost ecclesiastic perfume you won’t find in any Scotch.”

Bill Murray’s character in the movie Lost in Translation would approve.

Cowboy Codes Of The West

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These American cowboy codes of the west were common sense approaches to cowboy and western etiquette. Many deal with horses, shooting and a little bit about how to act around a woman.

Never pass anyone on the trail without saying “Howdy”

When approaching someone from behind, give a loud greeting before you get within pistol shot.

Don’t wave at a man on a horse. It might spook the horse and the man will think you’re an idiot (a nod is the proper greeting).

After you pass someone on the trail, don’t look back at him. It implies you don’t trust him.

Riding another man’s horse without his permission is nearly as bad as making love to his wife. Never even bother another man’s horse.

Never shoot an unarmed man. Never shoot a woman at all.

A cowboy is pleasant, even when out of sorts. Complaining is what quitters do and cowboys hate quitters.

Always be courageous. Cowards aren’t tolerated in any outfit worth its salt.

A cowboy always helps someone in need, even a stranger or enemy.

When you leave town after a weekend of carousing, it’s perfectly all right to shoot your six-guns into the air, whoop like crazy and ride your horse as fast as you can. This is called “hurrahing” a town.

A horse thief may be hung peremptory.

Never try on another man’s hat.

Never wake another man by shaking or touching him. He might wake up suddenly and shoot you.

Real cowboys are modest. A braggart who is “all gurgle and no guts” is not tolerated.

A cowboy doesn’t talk much; he saves his breath for breathing.

No matter how weary and hungry you are after a long day in the saddle, always tend to your horse’s needs before your own, and get your horse some feed before you eat.

Cuss all you want, but only around men, horses and cows.

Furious 7 – Trailer

Take five with Marty Robbins y’all

Texas Hunting And Fishing Through The Years

An angler stands next to his catch, a 7 foot long tarpon caught near Palacios, Texas on September 3,

An angler stands next to his catch, a 7 foot long tarpon caught near Palacios, Texas on September 3, 1923.

Archie Underwwod (R) cotton man, Marvin Hall (L) state fire insurance commisioner; fishing at Lake U

Archie Underwwod (R) cotton man, Marvin Hall (L) state fire insurance commisioner; fishing at Lake Undy near Underwood’s home, 1942.

The game warden inspecting the hunter's gun, 1946.

The game warden inspecting the hunter’s gun, 1946.

Mrs. Parker giving a bird that her husband shot to another man who claimed it, 1946.

Mrs. Parker giving a bird that her husband shot to another man who claimed it, 1946

A hunter raising his shotgun at a flock of doves, 1946.

A hunter raising his shotgun at a flock of doves, 1946.

Fred Gipson and dogs running coon up a tree during hunt, 1949.

Fred Gipson and dogs running coon up a tree during hunt, 1949

Fred Gipson with dogs during coon hunt, 1949.

Fred Gipson with dogs during coon hunt, 1949.

Exhausted Mike Gipson sleeping in car after 1949 coon hunt.

Exhausted Mike Gipson sleeping in car after 1949 coon hunt.

Author Fred Gipson with his son Mike who is running to his mother who is waiting at the gate after c

Author Fred Gipson with his son Mike who is running to his mother who is waiting at the gate after coon hunt, 1949.

Author Fred Gipson with his son Mike who is hugging his mother after coming home from coon hunt, 194

Author Fred Gipson with his son Mike who is hugging his mother after coming home from coon hunt, 1949.

Dogs Nettie and Duke greeting Author Fred Gipson and his son Mike before the coon hunt, 1949.

Dogs Nettie and Duke greeting Author Fred Gipson and his son Mike before the coon hunt, 1949.

Lugging back a deer, after an early morning hunting trip, 1952.

Lugging back a deer, after an early morning hunting trip, 1952.

A woman stands on a pier next to a 51 pound cobia caught on 30 pound line near Port Isabel, Texas on

A woman stands on a pier next to a 51 pound cobia caught on 30 pound line near Port Isabel, Texas on June 25, 1954.

Oil workers fishing trout by light of oil flare at Shamrock Cove in the Gulf of Mexico in 1954.

Oil workers fishing trout by light of oil flare at Shamrock Cove in the Gulf of Mexico in 1954.

Oil workers fishing trout by light of oil flare at Shamrock Cove in the Gulf of Mexico in 1954.

Oil workers fishing trout by light of oil flare at Shamrock Cove in the Gulf of Mexico in 1954.

A group of quail hunters riding in a converted truck during a visit on a ranch in 1956.

A group of quail hunters riding in a converted truck during a visit on a ranch in 1956.

Boy shooting deer, 1960.

Boy shooting deer, 1960.

Cooking fish after catching them at the beach, 1961.

Cooking fish after catching them at the beach, 1961.

Surf fishing with net, 1961.

Surf fishing with net, 1961.

Author Fred Gipson (center L) showing off trophies, 1960.

Author Fred Gipson (center L) showing off trophies, 1960.

Members of the Thrash and Burns families, and their friends hunt white-winged doves along a muddy, d

Members of the Thrash and Burns families, and their friends hunt white-winged doves along a muddy, dirt road, Giddings, Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunter with his kill, 1961.

Dove hunter with his kill, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunt in Texas, 1961.

Dove hunters enjoying the day's kill, 1961.

Dove hunters enjoying the day’s kill, 1961.

Child petting dead bird at dove hunt, 1961.

Child petting dead bird at dove hunt, 1961.

Women plucking the killed dove, 1961.

Real women plucking the killed dove, 1961.

A man stands outside a gate from which the carcasses of dead animals hang, Texas, 1968.

A man stands outside a gate from which the carcasses of dead animals hang, Texas, 1968.

Sue Borman hugs her sons Fred and Ed, both of whom wear camouflage jackets and hold shotguns, Housto

Sue Borman hugs her sons Fred and Ed, both of whom wear camouflage jackets and hold shotguns, Houston, Texas, December 1968. The boys’ father, and Sue’s husband, is Apollo 8 astronaut Frank Borman.

A boy stands holding a fishing rod and a 12 pound 6 ounce largemouth bass he caught on August 19, 19

A boy stands holding a fishing rod and a 12 pound 6 ounce largemouth bass he caught on August 19, 1983 in San Augustine County, Texas

A man stands next to a 98 pound flathead catfish caught on June 2, 1986 near Lewisville, Texas and d

A man stands next to a 98 pound flathead catfish caught on June 2, 1986 near Lewisville, Texas and displayed on the back of a pickup truck.

US Pres. George Bush dressed in hunting gear w. friend/oil heir William Farish, both sporting shotgu

US Pres. George Bush dressed in hunting gear w. friend/oil heir William Farish, both sporting shotguns, on quail hunt at Lazy F ranch, 1989.

US Pres. George Bush aptly dressed in hunting gear w. rifle in hand hunting quail on the Lazy F ranc

US Pres. George Bush aptly dressed in hunting gear w. rifle in hand hunting quail on the Lazy F ranch in 1989.

103354 27: A child stands on a dead alligator during Gatorfest September 16, 1991 in Anahuac, TX. Hu

A child stands on a dead alligator during Gatorfest September 16, 1991 in Anahuac, TX. Hunters in Texas can only kill a certain number of alligators, must report each kill to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and are paid by the foot by buyers for each alligator harvested.

The winning gator in the Great Texas Alligator Roundup is on display during Gatorfest September 16,

The winning gator in the Great Texas Alligator Roundup is on display during Gatorfest September 16, 1991 in Anahuac.

8-yr-old Kemper Cowden with father, Lynn, during first deer hunt & male initiation, near the Pecos B

8-yr-old Kemper Cowden with father, Lynn, during first deer hunt & male initiation, near the Pecos Bend ranch in 1991.

Texas Governor George W. Bush looks up at the sky for an opportunity on the first day of Dove huntin

Texas Governor George W. Bush looks up at the sky for an opportunity on the first day of Dove hunting season in Hockley, Texas, September 1, 1994.

NASCAR Busch series driver and track announcer Wally Dallenbach, George Privett during the filming h

NASCAR Busch series driver and track announcer Wally Dallenbach, George Privett during the filming his outdoor show at Greystone Castle hunting lodge in Mingus, Texas in 2005.

Hunting dogs during the filming outdoor show at Greystone Castle hunting lodge in Mingus, Texas, in

Hunting dog during the filming outdoor show at Greystone Castle hunting lodge in Mingus, Texas, in 2005.