Tag Archives: technology

How To Check Your Phone For The CCP Virus Contact Tracker

If you downloaded the latest iOS update back in May, and any following updates, then congratulations…your COVID-19 infection status will likely soon be tracked by state health officials as part of each state’s contact tracing efforts.

Many iPhone users across the US have over the past few days started to notice a new setting under the “privacy” subtab of the iPhone health app. It looks like this, and allows users to “toggle on” COVID-19 exposure logging.

It’s all thanks to the latest update of Apple’s iOS operating system for iPhone, iOS13.5.

Let’s take a closer look.

Some on twitter have only just noticed the toggle button, and we must note that it appears to have been quietly installed by Apple in recent days.

A similar setting has been installed on Android phones.

Some users questioned whether Apple will truly respect their privacy regarding their COVID-19 status, or whether they’ve interacted with anyone who has the virus…or maybe even just passed them on the street or in the supermarket.

This is happening even as evidence suggests that most patients are infected by someone who either lives in, or frequently shares, the same space as them. Are you awake yet?

Source: ZeroHedge

All Four Major Wireless Carriers Hit With Lawsuits Over Sharing, Selling Location Data

(TechDirt) We’ve noted repeatedly that if you’re upset about Facebook’s privacy scandals, you should be equally concerned about the wireless industry’s ongoing location data scandals. Not only were the major carriers caught selling your location data to any nitwit with a checkbook, they were even found to be selling your E-911 location data, which provides even more granular detail about your data than GPS provides. This data was then found to have been widely abused from everybody from law enforcement to randos pretending to be law enforcement.

Throughout all this, the Ajit Pai FCC has done absolutely nothing to seriously police the problem. Meaning that while carriers have promised to stop collecting and selling this data, nobody has bothered to force carriers to actually confirm this. Given telecom’s history when it comes to consumer privacy, somebody might just want to double check their math (and ask what happened to all that data already collected and sold over the last decade).

Compounding carrier problems, all four major wireless carriers last week were hit with a class action lawsuit (correctly) noting the carriers had violated Section 222 of the Federal Communications Act by selling consumer proprietary network information (CPNI) data:

“Through its negligent and deliberate acts, including inexplicable failures to follow its own Privacy Policy, T-Mobile permitted access to Plaintiffs and Class Members’ CPI and CPNI,” the complaint against T-Mobile reads, referring to “confidential proprietary information” and “customer proprietary network information,” the latter of which includes location data.”

It’s likely that the sale of 911 data is where carriers are in the most hot water, since that’s their most obvious infraction of the law. It’s of course worth pointing out that wireless carriers (and fixed-line ISPs, frankly) have been hoovering up and selling location, clickstream, and a vast ocean of other user data for decades with very few (any?) Congressional lawmakers much caring about it. It’s another example of how Facebook’s cavalier treatment of user data (and government apathy toward meaningful solutions) isn’t just some errant exception — it’s the norm.

Back in 2016, the previous FCC uncharacteristically tried to impose some pretty basic rules that would have gone a long way in preventing these location data scandals by requiring that carriers be more transparent about what data is collected and who it’s sold to. It also required consumers opt in to more sensitive (read: financial, location) data. But telecom lobbyists quickly convinced Congress to obliterate those rules in 2017 using the Congressional Review Act before they could even take effect.

Two years later finds the sector swimming in scandal, and everybody has a dumb look on their faces utterly perplexed as to how we got to this point.

Source: TechDirt

‘Screens are Poison’: Tech Elites Keeping Devices Out of Their Children’s Schools

After a New York Times report highlighted that Silicon Valley tech elites are keeping digital devices out of the schools of their children, Tucker Carlson said on Monday they’re doing so because they know that “screens are poison.”

Author and psychotherapist Tom Kersting said on Tucker Carlson Tonight that the idea that digital devices will benefit students has now proven to be “absolutely false.”

He said that tech in the classroom is affecting kids’ emotions, contributing to anxiety, depression and suicide.

“Maybe now we can educate other parents that aren’t as aware as these Silicon Valley tech execs are.”

The Times report by Nellie Bowles discusses a “digital divide” between children of wealthy parents and those of middle-class parents.

“It could happen that the children of poorer and middle-class parents will be raised by screens, while the children of Silicon Valley’s elite will be going back to wooden toys and the luxury of human interaction,” Bowles wrote.

Carlson said that he was surprised that none of the tech elites are held accountable for pushing their products in less-wealthy schools.

“They never warn anybody about the threat that they clearly perceive,” he said.

Source: Fox News Insider