Two Of The Largest Riots In Recent Chinese History Occurred In Wuhan And Hong Kong Just Before Outbreak Of CCP-COVID-19

There are no coincidences in politics…

Thousands Protest Waste Incinerator Plans in China’s Wuhan (summer 2019)

Residents in the central Chinese city of Wuhan hold a street protest over plans to build a new waste incineration plant.

Residents in the central Chinese city of Wuhan hold a street protest over plans to build a new waste incineration plant.

Authorities in the central Chinese city of Wuhan have detained around 20 people in a crackdown this week on a mass street protest at plans to build a new waste incineration plant, RFA has learned.

Amid chants of “Give us back our clean environment!”, an estimated 10,000 residents from apartments near the Yangluo industrial development area in Wuhan’s Xinzhou district turned out against the plan on Tuesday and Wednesday, local residents said.

The local government dispatched around 1,000 riot police to disperse the crowd, with large numbers of injuries reported, they said.

Many of the arrests were of social media users for posting or forwarding information about the protests via the closely controlled platform WeChat.

A Xinzhou resident surnamed Xu said the protest was a spontaneous action by local people, who are angry that local officials are ignoring their health concerns.

“The site was originally a landfill,” Xu said. “The air quality is already very poor in Yangluo and the groundwater has been polluted for more than a decade.”

“Now they say they have to build a waste incineration power plant, which is a threat to our lives,” he said.

The waste incinerator plan comes after the Chenjiachong landfill site in Xinzhou exceeded its capacity just five years after its opening in 2007.

Local residents — who number around 400,000 — said they first learned of the renewed incinerator plan in mid-June, and immediately organized a petition against it. The government responded by having around 20 of the petitioners detained.

This week, the authorities blocked the mobile phone signal, as well as sending in police to beat up and detain protesters. According to Xu, the government feared the Wuhan protesters would communicate with anti-extradition protests in Hong Kong.

A local resident surnamed Zhang said the Xinzhou district government had responded to the protests by saying that it would consult more widely with local people, and that the project won’t go ahead without the consent of the local community.

No faith in authorities

But Zhang said many local residents simply don’t believe this.

“They tried to start a project like this here before, and the people kicked up a huge fuss, and it was shelved,” Zhang said.

“But less than six months later, the old district governor was transferred away, and the new one reapplied for the project as soon as he took up his post.”

A resident who declined to be named said it was unacceptable to build a waste incinerator in a densely populated residential area.

“There are many ways in which this will have an impact on people’s lives: the air pollution, the harm to health, all of that,” the resident said.

“But what government really speaks up for the people? None of them do. If they did, then no garbage incinerators would be built in residential areas,” he said.

Last month, tens of thousands of residents of Yunfu city in the southern province of Guangdong also took to the streets to protest against plans for a waste incinerator in Mintang village.

Three days later, the government announced the project would be canceled at the selected site.

And on June 26, authorities in Xiantao city in the central province of Hubei announced they would initially shelve, and then cancel altogether, a similar project following mass protests by local residents.

Decades of breakneck economic growth have left China with a seriously degraded environment, with regular environmental protests emerging among the country’s middle class.

Previous attempts to build similar plants elsewhere across China have drawn widespread criticism over local government access to the huge potential profits linked to waste disposal projects.

It’s all laid out here in a fascinating interview with Dr. Shiva Ayyadurai, inventor of email who among many other things points out that heart of the global deep state operates within a one mile radius between Harvard and MIT… 

Reported by Qiao Long for RFA’s Mandarin Service. Translated and edited by Luisetta Mudie.

Now that Italy Has 12 Cities, Including Milan, Under Quarantine, Maybe This 1/31/2020 Poster Is Onto Something

Submission Statement: 4chan anon posts on a board back in January how the Coronavirus is going to kill millions and cites in Italy as being used to model the growth rate and spread of the COVID19 virus. 3 weeks later it’s turning out he was probably right.

U.S. treasury yield curve action, supply chain collapses and COVID19 spread news during the past three weeks support further consideration about the following…

(larger image)

Source: The Watch Towers

Supply Chain Domino’s Are Falling – COVID-19 – Get Preps!

This…

Has lead to this… 

Supply chain issues continue to extend beyond automotive and tech; now it’s starting to affect household product supply chains. According to Forbes (Link) the American giant Procter and Gamble (2019 revenue: 67.68bn USD) says that it too now has significant problems. “We access 387 suppliers in China that ship to us globally more than 9,000 different materials, impacting approximately 17,600 different finished product items,” Jon Moeller, Procter & Gamble’s chief operating officer and chief financial officer, said Thursday at a conference in New York. “Each of these suppliers faces their own challenges in resuming operations.” The article adds that this will affect P&G’s profits in the China retail market.

www.forbes.com/sites/andriacheng/2020/02/20/chinas-coronavirus-outbreak-threatens-to-send-global-supply-chain-into-a-tailspin-pg-alone-has-17600-items-that-could-be-affected/#55888483156f

Bloomberg – another automotive runs into problems; Nissan is warning of disruptions in plants as far as the US due to the virus epidemic leading to parts shortages. They procure more than 800 parts from factories in Hubei and are concerned that many of these pats will run out (including such things as brake hoses and air conditioning controllers) if the plants do not come back online by today (the date the government indicated most production could resume). This could lead some Nissan output in Japan to be suspended as early as Jan 23rd with Malaysia following not longer after. Plants in the US, UK, India, Mexico, Russia and Spain may also have to stop production. A survey of their suppliers found only 58% said they’d be able to resume by Feb 10th with many others saying they couldn’t because they couldn’t get necessary government approval. Of those that have gone back online, only half of them could get the majority of their workforce working. (Link)
www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-02-19/virus-havoc-could-shut-down-a-nissan-factory-half-a-world-away

Reuters – major automotive parts manufacturer Valeo (19.48bn EUR revenue in 2019) says that most of its Chinese factories are now back online but not at full operational capacity. It expects production to fall by 2% this year and adds that that it is too early to evaluate the impact of the virus on the company’s 2020 results and the wider auto industry. (Link)
mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKBN20E2KC

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) says that Asia-Pacific airlines could lose $27.8 bn to coronavirus according to Philstar (Link). The estimate is based on projections of a 13-percent full-year decline in passenger demand, mostly in China. IATA’s CEO says that this will be the first time since the 2008-2009 financial crisis that demand for air travel has declined and that stopping the virus is a top priority. Airlines in China’s domestic market alone are estimated to lose around $12.8 billion in revenues, reversing an expected 4.8% growth into a 8.2% contraction.
www.philstar.com/business/2020/02/21/1994974/asia-pacific-airlines-could-lose-278-bn-coronavirus-iata

Food prices – China produces 80-90% of the worlds garlic supply (depending on which article you read) and the price of it is rising sharply. Prices in the US are up 29% from last year whilst wholesale prices are up even more to 60% higher than this time last year. The reason is difficulties in transportation and a shortage of labour as most people are yet to return to work (either because they’re unwilling or they’re physically unable). (Link).
www.livemint.com/market/commodities/here-s-something-that-you-will-think-stinks-super-high-garlic-prices-11582267581189.html

Amazon is beginning to worry about Prime day in July – the Seattle Times reports (link). Third party merchants account for about 60% of its sales and it has reached out to these merchants to understand how they might be impacted. Over the past few weeks, Amazon has responded to the crisis by making larger and more frequent orders of Chinese-made products that had already been shipped to the United States, according to company emails and consultants who work with major brands. Some of its suppliers have cut back on advertising and promotions on the site so they don’t run out of products too quickly. “Out of an abundance of caution, we are working with suppliers to secure additional inventory to ensure we maintain our selection for customers,” an Amazon spokeswoman said. The company later added, “We are monitoring developments related to the coronavirus and taking appropriate steps as needed.” Amazon’s algorithms have now asked for six to eight weeks of supply on products made in China instead of just two or three weeks.
www.seattletimes.com/business/when-you-click-buy-on-amazon-it-may-be-sweating-the-supply/

The Taiwanese commonwealth magazine has a thoroughly interesting read on whether Taiwanese companies can cope with the Coronavirus (link). It focuses on The Formosa Plastics Group (revenue: 67.2bn USD) first which has forecast that the coronavirus scare will hit it far harder than did the SARS crisis in 2003, with first quarter revenues, which were originally expected to take a turn for the better, likely to slump from the previous quarter. If China shuts down for an extended period of time and inventories build up, “under the worst case scenario, the crack spread [the difference in price between a refined product and crude oil] would fall below US$2, and we would cut production, which would mean we were producing below cost,” Formosa Petrochemical Corp. President Tsao Minh explained. Other industries are examined; automotive has significant issues which we all now know, but steel should be OK from a supply perspective because raw material comes from Australia, Brazil or Canada. The article finishes by explaining that the worst may yet be to come for the entertainment and tourism industries.
english.cw.com.tw/article/article.action?id=2656

Getting workers physically back to work – the SCMP (South China Morning Post) reports (link) that provincial governments in China’s east coast manufacturing hubs are chartering buses, planes and trains to get workers back into their factories to get things moving again; passenger traffic on public transport is only 1/5th of what it was this time last year. Couples returning to work at open factories are eligible for a one-off subsidy of 500 yuan (US$71), while a company that hires more staff than in the same period a year earlier can also receive subsidies up to 300,000 yuan (US$42,800) whilst the city of Yiwu is refunding bus and train tickets for workers who return if they arrive before tomorrow.

Economic woes spread to companies who don’t have supply chains: the Epoch Times has an article (link) waring that many small to medium sized enterprises don’t have large cash reserves and may struggle if the situation continues for a sustained period. Just 34 percent of nearly 1,000 small and medium-sized firms said they could survive for a month on current cashflow, a recent survey by Tsinghua University and Peking University showed. A third said they could last for two months, while 18 percent said they could stick it out for three months. One analyst estimates that total job losses in China could be as high as 4.5 million.
www.scmp.com/economy/china-economy/article/3051445/coronavirus-chinas-east-coast-provinces-offer-chartered

Apple’s Foxconn and Pegatron factories might be open, but don’t assume they’re fully staffed says MPR News (link). “One production line used to have 4,000 people. Now there are about a dozen remaining. My own production line usually has 1,000 workers, with about 60 now remaining,” says a female hanjia worker at Foxconn. (Hanjia means winter break, i.e. people who continue working through the spring holiday that most Chinese take off). Smaller manufacturers are having a harder time. A rare earths magnet maker that normally employs about 300 people in the city of Hangzhou, south of Kunshan, received permission to reopen from local authorities last week. The factory was able to begin manufacturing again with a skeleton crew after buying a large disinfectant machine. Rare earth magnets are used in everything from electronics to motors. For any factory to reopen now, “There’s paperwork that has to be submitted to the local government, and that includes guaranteeing masks, some other protective gear that employees can wear, a disinfecting schedule,” says manager Jen Ambrose, one of the few Americans who works at the magnet company.
www.mprnews.org/story/2020/02/19/npr-the-wide-ranging-ways-in-which-the-coronavirus-is-hurting-global-business

A white paper has arrived! Dun and Bradstreet have done a great report on the economic impact of the coronavirus. If you’re into economics, this is definitely worth a 15 minute read. Some takeaways: 90% of all active business in China are affected. At least 51,000 companies around the world have one or more direct tier 1 suppliers and at least 5 million have at least one or more tier 2 suppliers. Alternative countries for suppliers: Electrical machinery and parts could come from Brazil, the nuclear industry could tap Chile or Singapore, Furniture, plastics, toys and games could be covered by Mexico and Brazil, Motor vehicle parts as well as optical and surgical products could be covered by Chile, Colombia or India. Growth is certainly going to drop below previous forecasts but how much by depends on how fast the virus is contained.
www.dnb.com/perspectives/supply-chain/wuhan-coronavirus-business-impact.html?SERV=UPPCPOHP323237

If coronavirus isn’t brought to heel, economic bedlam awaits..

www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2020/02/22/coronavirus-isnt-brought-heel-economic-bedlam-awaits/

Covid-19 interrupting supply chains from watches to lobsters

www.thestar.com.my/news/regional/2020/02/22/oh-dear-covid-19-interrupting-supply-chains-from-watches-to-lobsters

Gloomy data, virus weigh on Wall St
‘UNKNOWN SITUATION’:There is a break in the supply chain as well as in the demand for products, which presents a challenge to global growth, an advisory firm manager said

www.taipeitimes.com/News/biz/archives/2020/02/23/2003731446

JCB to cut UK production as coronavirus hits supply chain

The private company will reduce the working hours of about 4,000 employees from Monday from 39 to 34 hours a week.Workers will be paid for a 39 hour week and bank the hours, working them back later in the year. Overtime will also be suspended, the group said on Thursday.

www.ft.com/content/ef3b2caa-4e73-11ea-95a0-43d18ec715f5

Southeast Asia’s garment supply chain torn up by virus

asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Coronavirus/Southeast-Asia-s-garment-supply-chain-torn-up-by-virus

YA THINK? Maybe Global Supply Chains Were A Bad Idea: The coronavirus outbreak exposes the peril of far-flung parts networks and the risk of paralysis.

www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2020-02-21/coronavirus-forces-a-rethinking-of-supply-chains

… and then there’s this …

This economy is dead. The corpse only appears alive because of all the parasites living off what remains, and each other.

Get ready…

Source: Investment Watch

The Cost Of Covid-19 Quarantine: Will You Be Financially Prepared?

(Daisy Luther) As the world tries frantically to contain a rapidly spreading outbreak of Covid-19, schools, public venues, tourist attractions, and workplaces are being closed in an attempt to keep even more people from contracting the illness. Quarantines and self-isolation protocols are also being instituted across the globe for those who may have been exposed.

Of course, everyone knows that millions of people in China have been in lockdown for more than a month. People are told to stay home, many businesses have ceased to operate, and Chinese New Year celebrations simply didn’t happen this year. China’s debts are all coming due now, at the worst possible time as the financial loss for the country has been astronomical. For example, car sales are down 92% and Lunar New Year celebrations and travel that usually earn a billion dollars were canceled.

While the numbers cited here are outrageously large, obviously, these losses aren’t only going to affect “the economy” and “the businesses.” They’re going to have devastating effects on normal folks who just want to go to work, pay their bills, and keep living their lives normally.

A great deal has been written about the economic hits on a global scale as well as the shortages we could soon expect as production in China grinds to a halt, but what about simply being able to pay your rent when your workplace or business is ordered to shut its doors?

Something nobody is really talking about is the financial hit that people will be taking during such closures. This is a very real concern, and for families who already live paycheck to paycheck, the loss of income could prove devastating.

How will containment efforts affect average folks financially?

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The Rate Of Diamond Princess Infections Suggest Worldwide Infections Are Much Higher Than Official Reports

SummaryThe Diamond Princess cruise ship is the largest controlled COVID-19 coronavirus infected population outside of China

  • 20% of the ship were infected over three weeks
  • From this, it suggests the rate of official reported infections (largely in China) is likely too low
  • This corroborates well with what our models have been saying: official reported infections are likely too low
  • From our models, far more people have likely been infected, but the death rate is also (thankfully) coming in lower than expected – worse than the flu, but perhaps in-line or lower than SARS, and definitely not a death sentence
  • Two passengers died last night from the Diamond Princess (male 87 and female 84) after being airlifted from the ship to a hospital a week ago, which implies a 1-2% death rate
  • And 14 days might not be long enough to conclusively prevent COVID-19 transmission, from the Diamond Princess experience, although passengers have now been released

The rate of Diamond Princess infections suggest worldwide infections are likely much higher than official reports

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WARNING: Over 7,500 Americans Isolated For Flu On US Soil

IRAN/SOUTH KOREA/JAPAN AND MULTIPLE OTHER NATIONS ARE FACING A THREAT THAT THEY FEAR COULD END IN PANIC AND UNCERTAINTY FOR THEIR ENTIRE COUNTRY. CITIES ARE COMPLETELY ISOLATED BY THE MILITARY. CITIZENS ARE BEING TOLD TO AVOID CROWDS.

TODAY, OVER 7500 AMERICANS ARE ISOLATED FOR THE FLU ON USA SOIL WITH MORE BEING ADDED EVERY DAY. THEY ARE TOLD TO AVOID ANYONE IN THE PUBLIC AND NOT GO TO A HOSPITAL UNLESS IT IS A LIFE EMERGENCY.

WHY ISN’T THE MAINLINE NEWS TELLING US ABOUT THIS?